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Why doctors hate their computers


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#1 golden_valley

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Posted 07 November 2018 - 12:32 PM

This long New Yorker article explores the impact of software on the day to day lives of doctors. I thought it was just me that has come to believe that doctors pay more attention to their screens than to me. It seems like doctors might feel the same. All the information obtained and stored is not as useful as one might think (except maybe for malpractice discovery purposes).

#2 Bact PhD

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Posted 07 November 2018 - 12:48 PM

View Postgolden_valley, on 07 November 2018 - 12:32 PM, said:

This long New Yorker article explores the impact of software on the day to day lives of doctors. I thought it was just me that has come to believe that doctors pay more attention to their screens than to me. It seems like doctors might feel the same. All the information obtained and stored is not as useful as one might think (except maybe for malpractice discovery purposes).
Haven’t read the article yet, but it doesn’t surprise me. My eye doc in particular (granted, he’s gotta be about eighty) grouses profusely about his iPad every time I go in there.
However, a friend of mine (granted, late 50s) in a different specialty seems to have embraced the technology.
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#3 LFC

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Posted 07 November 2018 - 01:09 PM

I got part way through and hit the section about the patient benefits, something we've seen first hand for my wife who suffers from a chronic illness. I couldn't agree more. Yes, they need to get better at not eating doctors' time (better UX, assistants to do data entry, voice input, etc.) but having experienced the joy of watching my wife continue to suffer as multiple doctors floundered around or wanted yet another f***ing chest X-ray because they couldn't access the paper records or incompatible systems of other doctors all I can say is "suck it up, buttercup." Much like Obamacare we're far from perfect but way ahead of where we were.
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#4 Practical Girl

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Posted 02 May 2019 - 12:28 PM

I do think that age of the doc is a factor. My favorite neurologist (older/very experienced) basically retired in protest. I also think it matters with hierarchy- what is the specialty?

My primary care doc- she's got the computer through the whole thing. At certain points, she's sending necessary prescription renewals to my pharmacy. At all points, she's listening. But we make little eye contact.

My surgeons- latest and greatest, lol- completely different. Shoulder doc has an assistant who does all the transcription, while he looks directly at his patient. He gets to spend more "quality" time with his patients- evaluate their body movement etc. Pretty stunning, as I've seen the result. By the time I leave the exam room, it's all on his computer. He is able to check it with his staff, make sure follow-up is clear before I leave. Hip doc- even weirder. He has a transcriptionist from the Philippines, on a screen. But the same thing happens, at the end. Very efficient, cost-effective. I do keep in mind that these docs make a whole lot more money than a primary doc group- much harder for PC to afford.
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