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Saudi Arabia Declares "Victories" in Yemen Which Pay Off and Strengthen Al-Qaida


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#1 LFC

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Posted 07 August 2018 - 05:01 PM

Remember how Trump had a "plan" to take care of ISIS and all the other terrorists? Apparently part of that plan is to back Saudi Arabia to the hilt in their war in Yemen which is enriching al-Qaida fighters. Nice job, Trump. America has enough trouble learning from its mistakes. Trump puts that intellectual incuriousity on steroids.

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Again and again over the past two years, a military coalition led by Saudi Arabia and backed by the United States has claimed it won decisive victories that drove al-Qaida militants from their strongholds across Yemen and shattered their ability to attack the West.

Here’s what the victors did not disclose: many of their conquests came without firing a shot.

That’s because the coalition cut secret deals with al-Qaida fighters, paying some to leave key cities and towns and letting others retreat with weapons, equipment and wads of looted cash, an investigation by The Associated Press has found. Hundreds more were recruited to join the coalition itself.

These compromises and alliances have allowed al-Qaida militants to survive to fight another day — and risk strengthening the most dangerous branch of the terror network that carried out the 9/11 attacks. Key participants in the pacts said the U.S. was aware of the arrangements and held off on any drone strikes.

The deals uncovered by the AP reflect the contradictory interests of the two wars being waged simultaneously in this southwestern corner of the Arabian Peninsula.

In one conflict, the U.S. is working with its Arab allies — particularly the United Arab Emirates — with the aim of eliminating the branch of extremists known as al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, or AQAP. But the larger mission is to win the civil war against the Houthis, Iranian-backed Shiite rebels. And in that fight, al-Qaida militants are effectively on the same side as the Saudi-led coalition — and, by extension, the United States.

“Elements of the U.S. military are clearly aware that much of what the U.S. is doing in Yemen is aiding AQAP and there is much angst about that,” said Michael Horton, a fellow at the Jamestown Foundation, a U.S. analysis group that tracks terrorism.

“However, supporting the UAE and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia against what the U.S. views as Iranian expansionism takes priority over battling AQAP and even stabilizing Yemen,” Horton said.

" 'Individual conscience' means that women only get contraceptives if their employers, their physicians, their pharmacists, their husbands and/or fathers, pastors, and possibly their mayors, Governors, State Secretaries of Health, Congressmen, Senators, and President all agree that in that particular case they're justifiable." --D.C. Sessions

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#2 LFC

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Posted 20 September 2018 - 11:26 AM

Pompeo backed Saudi Arabia's war in Yemen to prop up arms sales. How cliche.

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Secretary of State Mike Pompeo backed continued U.S. military support for Saudi Arabia’s war in Yemen in order to protect $2 billion in U.S. weapons sales, The Wall Street Journal reports. Citing a classified memo and anonymous officials, the report states Pompeo overruled concerns from State Department staff about the spiraling death toll in the conflict. More than 16,700 civilians have been killed or injured in Yemen, according to the United Nations, which ranks it as the world’s worst humanitarian crisis. Pompeo reportedly sided with his legislative affairs team after they claimed that cutting off support could ruin plans to sell 120,000 precision-guided missiles to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said she wouldn’t comment on “the deliberative process or allegedly leaked documents.” The U.S. provides the Saudi-led coalition with weapons sales and the aerial refuellng of jet-fighters destined for airstrikes.

" 'Individual conscience' means that women only get contraceptives if their employers, their physicians, their pharmacists, their husbands and/or fathers, pastors, and possibly their mayors, Governors, State Secretaries of Health, Congressmen, Senators, and President all agree that in that particular case they're justifiable." --D.C. Sessions

"That's the problem with being implacable foes - no one has any incentive to treat you as anything more than an obstacle to be overcome."

"The 'Road to Serfdom' is really all right turns." --Progressive Whisperer

""The GOP ... where every accusation is also a confession." --Progressive Whisperer

#3 LFC

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Posted 16 January 2019 - 05:13 PM

Great. We're not just supporting Saudi Arabia's war in Yemen with rhetoric, we're also involved.

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Newly obtained documents reveal that the United States has been training United Arab Emirates troops “for combat operations in Yemen,” Yahoo News reports. The revelation flies in the face of an announcement from the Pentagon last November saying that it was ceasing aerial refueling of Saudi-led coalition aircraft operating in Yemen. The documents also underscore frustrations over the lack of transparency surrounding U.S. military support for a war that has killed thousands of civilians and pushed Yemen to famine. The United States is “not a participant in the civil war in Yemen nor are we supporting one side or the other,” General Joseph F. Dunford, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said last month, echoing the Pentagon. However, the new documents reportedly show that the U.S. military has been even more deeply involved in the war than previously indicated, despite unambiguous claims to the contrary.

" 'Individual conscience' means that women only get contraceptives if their employers, their physicians, their pharmacists, their husbands and/or fathers, pastors, and possibly their mayors, Governors, State Secretaries of Health, Congressmen, Senators, and President all agree that in that particular case they're justifiable." --D.C. Sessions

"That's the problem with being implacable foes - no one has any incentive to treat you as anything more than an obstacle to be overcome."

"The 'Road to Serfdom' is really all right turns." --Progressive Whisperer

""The GOP ... where every accusation is also a confession." --Progressive Whisperer

#4 George Rowell

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Posted 16 January 2019 - 08:04 PM

View PostLFC, on 16 January 2019 - 05:13 PM, said:

Great. We're not just supporting Saudi Arabia's war in Yemen with rhetoric, we're also involved.
Apart from the famous NYT article, which could be dismissed as click bait journalism, we have not had much coverage of the 85,000 children who have died of hunger or the 13 million Yemenis on the brink of starvation either. The administration call it an Iran backed war, which of course justifies any amount of slaughter, but if Iran is there, then it is extremely thin on the ground. On the other hand we know that the Saudi war against the Houthis is undeniably US backed. The state department has been very vocal about probable Iran smuggling Fadre missiles and other arms to rebels in contravention of the UN embargo with displays of captured and other weapons but articles like this Reuters article leave me less than convinced. It is just another dirty war supporting an Arab dictator.

https://www.reuters....n-idUSKCN1NY1XL
A doctor knows a little about a lot. A specialist knows a lot about a little. In time the doctor knows less and less about more and more and the specialist knows more and more about less and less until ultimately the doctor knows nothing about everything and the specialist knows everything about nothing.

#5 Beelzebuddy

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Posted 17 January 2019 - 11:15 AM

View PostGeorge Rowell, on 16 January 2019 - 08:04 PM, said:

Apart from the famous NYT article, which could be dismissed as click bait journalism, we have not had much coverage of the 85,000 children who have died of hunger or the 13 million Yemenis on the brink of starvation either. The administration call it an Iran backed war, which of course justifies any amount of slaughter, but if Iran is there, then it is extremely thin on the ground. On the other hand we know that the Saudi war against the Houthis is undeniably US backed. The state department has been very vocal about probable Iran smuggling Fadre missiles and other arms to rebels in contravention of the UN embargo with displays of captured and other weapons but articles like this Reuters article leave me less than convinced. It is just another dirty war supporting an Arab dictator.

https://www.reuters....n-idUSKCN1NY1XL

https://www.cnn.com/...intl/index.html
https://www.bbc.com/...e-east-46261983
https://www.pbs.org/...-aid-group-says
https://www.usatoday...ger/2076683002/
https://www.theguard...ve-the-children
https://www.washingt...m=.0665355d8070
https://abcnews.go.c...ory?id=59340453
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#6 George Rowell

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Posted 17 January 2019 - 12:17 PM

View PostBeelzebuddy, on 17 January 2019 - 11:15 AM, said:

Nice investigative reporting there! Cane me teacher.

I still think that proves my point, but rather less than I had imagined. The NYT published their story on Nov 21 and nearly all others on that same day. Then it went quiet.

We have heard so much about the sieges in Syria, Aleppo for example, Yahoo would sometimes print several news agencies in a single a day and day after day. The children starving in the Yemen is an ongoing nightmare but it is under reported. The NYT made more splashes in December 7, 12 and 27, good, good good. Although I do not think they all made it to Yahoo and Yahoo is probably the most widely read.

If you read the NYT then I agree you will have been well saturated with this story. It may come down to what media you read.
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#7 golden_valley

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Posted 17 January 2019 - 05:38 PM

View PostGeorge Rowell, on 17 January 2019 - 12:17 PM, said:

It may come down to what media you read.

Isn't that true for most events and issues? The problem lies in the fact that some media never addresses events that they can't spin, shade, or color in a way that is acceptable to the $$$ backing the media and its audience.

#8 baw1064

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Posted 17 January 2019 - 06:08 PM

View Postgolden_valley, on 17 January 2019 - 05:38 PM, said:

The problem lies in the fact that some media never addresses events that they can't spin, shade, or color in a way that is acceptable to the $$$ backing the media and its audience.

Yeah, Fox News, we mean you! (among others)
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#9 George Rowell

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Posted 18 January 2019 - 12:02 AM

View Postgolden_valley, on 17 January 2019 - 05:38 PM, said:

Isn't that true for most events and issues? The problem lies in the fact that some media never addresses events that they can't spin, shade, or color in a way that is acceptable to the $$$ backing the media and its audience.
Golden Valley. I was actually stunned when I did some more research and found the famine in the Yemen has been widely reported, by lots of media. I just had not seen it and I still do not really understand the mechanism of this. I am an avid news reader after all. Maybe I need to get my head out of Yahoo. I am interested how I fell so far of the mark.
A doctor knows a little about a lot. A specialist knows a lot about a little. In time the doctor knows less and less about more and more and the specialist knows more and more about less and less until ultimately the doctor knows nothing about everything and the specialist knows everything about nothing.

#10 George Rowell

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Posted 18 January 2019 - 12:05 AM

View Postbaw1064, on 17 January 2019 - 06:08 PM, said:

Yeah, Fox News, we mean you! (among others)
Yes I am sure that is part of it. Obviously my news reading methodology is flawed too and I find that a bit scary.
A doctor knows a little about a lot. A specialist knows a lot about a little. In time the doctor knows less and less about more and more and the specialist knows more and more about less and less until ultimately the doctor knows nothing about everything and the specialist knows everything about nothing.

#11 George Rowell

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Posted 18 January 2019 - 12:08 AM

If you have signed in Yahoo does select the stories it streams to you. It tends to give you what you want.
A doctor knows a little about a lot. A specialist knows a lot about a little. In time the doctor knows less and less about more and more and the specialist knows more and more about less and less until ultimately the doctor knows nothing about everything and the specialist knows everything about nothing.





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