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#61 indy

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 09:56 AM

Gowdy looked like he just came off a three day bender. Sad to see a man who devoted his entire career to the United States crucified by this bunch of assholes on behalf of Donald Trump, of all people. Gohmert, Gosar, and Trump are three people who could serve the country best from the bed of a nursing home while under heavy medication.

#62 golden_valley

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 01:16 PM

Another hacking indictment was just announced or as Lawyers Guns and Money put it Witch hunt is finding a surprising number of witches.

#63 indy

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 01:35 PM

From the indictment:

On or about August 15, 2016, the Conspirators, posing as Guccifer 2.0, received a request for stolen documents from a candidate for US Congress.

Who was it, I wonder?

#64 golden_valley

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 01:43 PM

Pro Trump people are pointing out that Rosenstein still says this offers no evidence that it had an impact on the election. I don't think that was in the charge to the special prosecutor. He was asked to investigate interference, not prove that interference accomplished its purpose.

#65 Traveler

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 01:46 PM

Quote

“On or about August 15, 2016, the conspirators, posing as Guccifer 2.0, received a request for stolen documents from a candidate for the U.S. Congress,” the indictment states. “The conspirators responded using the Guccifer 2.0 persona and sent the candidate stolen documents related to the candidate’s opponent.” The indictment does not identify the candidate.

The indictment also describes an online conversation between the GRU, posing as Guccifer 2.0, and a “person who was in regular contact with senior members of the presidential campaign.” People familiar with the case said that person is longtime Trump adviser Roger Stone. In August 2016 the hacker persona wrote to Stone: “please tell me if i can help u anyhow... it would be a great pleasure to me.”

"Men occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of them pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing had happened."-- Winston Churchill
"Anyone who has the power to make you believe absurdities has the power to make you commit injustices" Voltaire

#66 golden_valley

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 01:47 PM

Words from Rosenstein in connection with the indictment:

Quote


“I want to caution you: People who speculate about federal investigations usually do not know all of the relevant facts,” he said. “We do not try cases on television or in congressional hearings. Most anonymous leaks are not from the government officials who are actually conducting these investigations.”

He also cautioned against partisanship.



“When we confront foreign interference in American elections, it’s important for us to avoid thinking politically as Republicans or Democrats, and instead to think patriotically as Americans. Our response must not depend on which side was victimized.”

https://www.thedaily...n-2016?ref=home

#67 golden_valley

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 01:51 PM

Trump supporters should ask themselves if they willing to establish a precedent that allows campaigns to contact persons to obtain stolen information as an acceptable practice.

#68 indy

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 01:56 PM

View Postgolden_valley, on 13 July 2018 - 01:51 PM, said:

Trump supporters should ask themselves if they willing to establish a precedent that allows campaigns to contact persons to obtain stolen information as an acceptable practice.

Trump supporters will be asking: 'what duz precedent mean?'

#69 Traveler

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 02:03 PM

The congressman was likely tied in with this guy.
"Men occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of them pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing had happened."-- Winston Churchill
"Anyone who has the power to make you believe absurdities has the power to make you commit injustices" Voltaire

#70 Traveler

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 10:29 AM

Couple of good takes on what those indictments mean. First, how well we penetrated Russian cyberspace. Here is a good summary from JustSecurity. Then Lawfare gives us more discussion.

Quote

Based on the public record and the new information in the indictment, here is what we now know happened leading up to the hack and release of John Podesta’s emails.

On March 19, 2016, Podesta received a spearphishing email, ostensibly from Google but actually from the GRU. We knew this even before Friday’s indictment, ironically, because Wikileaks published all of John Podesta’s stolen emails, including the spearphishing email itself. The indictment names GRU officer Aleksey Lukashev as the sender, but the email itself and its public attribution to the GRU are not new. From the phishing email in the Wikileaks archive, we are able to reconstruct what the spearphishing email looked like and the actions taken by Podesta that resulted in his emails dominating headlines in the final few weeks of the 2016 election campaign.
Posted Image
John Podesta spearphishing email (reconstruction)
Although this email was carefully crafted by Russian intelligence officers to look authentic, this email did not come from Google; there had been no genuine attempt to log in to Podesta’s email from Ukraine, and the link on “Change Password” led to a website operated by the GRU. Steps taken with this email include tricks like constructing the text “Someone has your password” using non-English variants of the letter “o” so as to evade automatic detection by Google’s spam filters.

It was also known before Friday what happened next: Podesta forwarded the email to members of his staff. They wrongly concluded that the email was genuine, and Podesta clicked on the link. We know this because this email chain is among the messages leaked by Wikileaks.

This much we already knew: the “Change Password” button on the phishing email took Podesta to a website controlled by the GRU, but first it bounced through the URL shortening service Bit.ly. Unfortunately for the GRU, here the hackers screwed up. The Bitly link reveals a lot of information about the GRU operation, and using this information we can reconstruct what Podesta saw when he clicked the link:

Posted Image
Reconstruction of the John Podesta phishing page
The indictment confirms that although this website was designed to look like a login page for Google, it was, in fact, operated by the Russian government. But the GRU made a mistake that allowed private-sector researchers to tie the phishing of Podesta to the GRU even before Friday’s indictment. When shortening the spearphishing link to send to Podesta using URL-shortening service Bitly, the GRU officer running the operation was logged in. This error allowed private investigators to connect the Podesta phishing email to huge numbers of other phishing emails sent by the GRU. Mueller now adds that, the specific officer who was logged in was, in fact, Lukashev, and his account name was “john356gh.”

Although this attribution was previously known, the indictment makes public some previously unknown details. For example, it’s now clear that this phishing campaign wasn’t done merely on behalf of the GRU but was done internally by GRU officers directly. We now know which officers at the GRU were at the keyboard conducting the operation: Lukashev managed the spearphishing infrastructure, and another officer, Ivan Sergeyevich Yermakov, spent time researching the specific targets at the DNC who were sent the emails. All of this gives the lie to Russia’s claim Friday, in response to the indictment, that the charges are “mud-slinging” intended to “spoil the atmosphere” ahead of the Trump-Putin summit.

[...]
This indictment, by contrast, offers a potential factual breakthrough. It tells us that the prior factual premise was wrong: the alleged conduct violating the CFAA continued to occur throughout the summer of 2016. That affects the earlier analysis in two ways. First, it makes clear that the Russians did intend to release the information at the time the hacking occured. Second, and perhaps more important, the indictment alleges that the criminal hacking conspiracy was ongoing at the time individuals in the Trump campaign were in contact with charged and uncharged Russian conspirators, raising the possibility of more straightforward aiding and abetting liability.

In other words, stay tuned. This indictment represents a tightening of the ring in the story of criminal prosecution for the 2016 election hacking. The government has now alleged that the social media manipulations by Russian actors constituted a criminal conspiracy. It has alleged as well that the hacking of Democratic Party and Clinton campaign emails were crimes conducted by officers of the Russian state. The question remains: Who, if anyone, helped?

"Men occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of them pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing had happened."-- Winston Churchill
"Anyone who has the power to make you believe absurdities has the power to make you commit injustices" Voltaire

#71 Traveler

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 10:33 AM

Meanwhile the NYT neatly summarizes what we all know about the NYC office of the FBI.
"Men occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of them pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing had happened."-- Winston Churchill
"Anyone who has the power to make you believe absurdities has the power to make you commit injustices" Voltaire

#72 golden_valley

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 10:45 AM

View PostTraveler, on 16 July 2018 - 10:33 AM, said:


I had to laugh a little at this from the article:

Quote

Mr. Kallstrom, who founded a nonprofit that received more than $1.3 million in donations from Mr. Trump, toldMegyn Kelly, “The agents are furious.” In one radio interview, Mr. Kallstrom even called the Clintons a “crime family” akin to the New York Mafia: “It’s like organized crime,” he said, and “the Clinton Foundation is a cesspool.”

I guess he never heard of the many rumors about Trump's business dealings?

#73 indy

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 11:23 AM

Yesterday Trump called the EU our 'foe' and today bad U.S.-Russia relations are the result of 'U.S. foolishness and stupidity'.

You know, I don't think I've ever seriously wished to see somebody keel over from a heart attack before today.

#74 indy

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 11:44 AM

That press conference with Putin is the most disgraceful performance I've ever seen by an American politician on a world stage.

#75 golden_valley

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 11:47 AM

Here's the text of the news conference.

from Putin on Syria:





Quote


Also crushing (ph) terrorists in the southwest of Syria. The south of Syria should be brought to the full compliance with the treaty of 1974, about the separation of forces -- about separation of forces of Israel and Syria. This will bring peace to Golan Heights, and bring more peaceful relationship between Syria and Israel, and also to provide security of the state of Israel.

Mr. President paid special attention to the issue during today's negotiations. And I would like to confirm that Russia is interested in this development and will act accordingly.








Quote


Let me remind you that thanks to the Iranian nuclear deal, Iran became the most controlled country in the world. It submitted to the control of IAEA. It effectively ensured the exclusively peaceful nature of Iranian nuclear program and strengthened the nonproliferation regime.


I wonder if the President paid "special attention" to that issue.

Quote


Once again, President Trump mentioned the issue of the so-called interference of Russia with the American elections, and I had to reiterate things I said several times, including during our personal contacts, that the Russian state has never interfered and is not going to interfere into internal American affairs, including election process.

Any specific material -- if such things arise -- we are ready to analyze together. For instance, we can analyze them through the joint working group on cyber-security, the establishment of which we discussed during our previous contacts.



In other words, we're going to figure out how the Mueller Investigation figured this stuff out.

#76 gmat

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 03:23 PM

View Postindy, on 16 July 2018 - 11:44 AM, said:

That press conference with Putin is the most disgraceful performance I've ever seen by an American politician on a world stage.

Worse than I expected (just proves I don’t get his 4D-Chess strategy, I guess)

Not even Fox News can spin it.

#77 Traveler

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 03:28 PM

No way could I possibly watch that train wreck....
"Men occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of them pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing had happened."-- Winston Churchill
"Anyone who has the power to make you believe absurdities has the power to make you commit injustices" Voltaire

#78 gmat

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 03:32 PM

View PostTraveler, on 16 July 2018 - 03:28 PM, said:

No way could I possibly watch that train wreck....

I know what you mean. I can’t have the guy on my TV. I have to work with transcripts and news reports. Can’t do video. Getting to where I can’t do photographs. When I travel outside the country I tell people I’m Canadian.

#79 golden_valley

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 03:42 PM

For Traveler and gmat (WARNING there are pictures):

Here's the Vanity Fair view of the event:


Quote


If possible, the president’s remarks were even less adversarial than his body language; he made no mention before the meeting of the indictment of a dozen Russian intelligence officials for hacking the Democratic National Committee in 2016, a circumstance he tweeted about just once over the weekend, casting the blame on Barack Obama’s administration. And when he emerged from the meeting two hours later, he appeared to side with Putin over his own intelligence agencies. ”Where are the servers?” he asked a stunned room, presumably referring to Hillary Clinton’s e-mails and the D.N.C.’s compromised servers. ”My people came to me . . . they said they think it’s Russia. I have President Putin. He just said it’s not Russia. I will say this: I don’t see any reason why it would be, but I really do want to see the server. So I have great confidence in my intelligence people, but I will tell you that President Putin was extremely strong and powerful in his denial today.” (As if to highlight Trump’s inanity, Putin told later told reporters, “Yes, I did [want Trump to win the election]. Yes, I did. Because he talked about bringing the U.S.-Russia relationship back to normal.”)


Putin chimed in, insisting once again that Russia had not interfered in the election, and going so far as to suggest that Russia and the United States form a ”working group” to get to the bottom of the whole thing. ”I think that's an incredible offer,” said Trump, who periodically leaned over to see whether Putin had agreed or responded to his praises.




WTF?

#80 baw1064

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 03:49 PM

View Postgolden_valley, on 13 July 2018 - 01:51 PM, said:

Trump supporters should ask themselves if they willing to establish a precedent that allows campaigns to contact persons to obtain stolen information as an acceptable practice.

They'll point out that Trump is now "Precedent" and that if he wants to do that, it's all good. Because MAGA.
“Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, Nothing is going to get better. It's not.” --Dr. Seuss





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