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#1121 golden_valley

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Posted 03 March 2021 - 07:31 PM

View Postpnwguy, on 03 March 2021 - 04:26 PM, said:

Unions are respected and even appreciated by European businesses. But I think the union movement in the US suffers from one MAJOR difference -- most are mobbed up.

Union bosses are tightly interwound with mob bosses. Their health and welfare money is skimmed. The mobsters supply "muscle" to keep the business owners terrorized and suck them for no-work positions. And then they foment territory wars between different unions for who they represent.

So interesting that my view of unions is different from the above, however my husband's is a little more in line with the mobbed up view. My grandad was a United Mine Worker member but that is a different animal than the construction trade unions. My husband was raised on the Northeastern Seaboard so his view is shaped by that (and by watching the Sopranos too).

#1122 AnBr

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Posted 05 March 2021 - 07:47 PM

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“Trump’s a stupid man’s idea of a smart person, a poor man’s idea of a rich person & a weak man’s idea of a strong man.”

— Fran Lebowitz


“One of the saddest lessons of history is this: If we've been bamboozled long enough, we tend to reject any evidence of the bamboozle. We’re no longer interested in finding out the truth. The bamboozle has captured us. It's simply too painful to acknowledge, even to ourselves, that we’ve been taken. Once you give a charlatan power over you, you almost never get it back.”

— Carl Sagan


Pray for Trump: Psalm 109:8

"Science is more than a body of knowledge; it is a way of thinking. I have a foreboding of an America in my children's or grandchildren's time - when the United States is a service and information economy; when nearly all the key manufacturing industries have slipped away to other countries; when awesome technological powers arc in the hands of a very few, and no one representing the public interest can even grasp the issues; when the people have lost the ability to set their own agendas or knowledgeably question those in authority; when, clutching our crystals and nervously consulting our horoscopes, our critical faculties in decline, unable to distinguish between what feels good and what's true, we slide, almost without noticing, back into superstition and darkness.

— Carl Sagan
The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark
1995


“As democracy is perfected, the office of president represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron.”

— H.L. Mencken
On Politics: A Carnival of Buncombe


“The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little.”

— Franklin Delano Roosevelt
Second inaugural address January, 1937

#1123 AnBr

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Posted 06 March 2021 - 09:00 PM

Quote

Economism: the overly simplistic beliefs taught in Econ 101—extrapolated to be gospel. This grade-school reduction of complexity has guided global economic policy for decades.

How Ideologues Use Grade-School Economics to Distort Minimum Wage Debates
“Trump’s a stupid man’s idea of a smart person, a poor man’s idea of a rich person & a weak man’s idea of a strong man.”

— Fran Lebowitz


“One of the saddest lessons of history is this: If we've been bamboozled long enough, we tend to reject any evidence of the bamboozle. We’re no longer interested in finding out the truth. The bamboozle has captured us. It's simply too painful to acknowledge, even to ourselves, that we’ve been taken. Once you give a charlatan power over you, you almost never get it back.”

— Carl Sagan


Pray for Trump: Psalm 109:8

"Science is more than a body of knowledge; it is a way of thinking. I have a foreboding of an America in my children's or grandchildren's time - when the United States is a service and information economy; when nearly all the key manufacturing industries have slipped away to other countries; when awesome technological powers arc in the hands of a very few, and no one representing the public interest can even grasp the issues; when the people have lost the ability to set their own agendas or knowledgeably question those in authority; when, clutching our crystals and nervously consulting our horoscopes, our critical faculties in decline, unable to distinguish between what feels good and what's true, we slide, almost without noticing, back into superstition and darkness.

— Carl Sagan
The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark
1995


“As democracy is perfected, the office of president represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron.”

— H.L. Mencken
On Politics: A Carnival of Buncombe


“The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little.”

— Franklin Delano Roosevelt
Second inaugural address January, 1937

#1124 LFC

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Posted 08 March 2021 - 02:15 PM

Manchin continues to be interesting to me. Here he is basically saying that there are a lot of Republican Senators (and maybe Representatives) who actually agree with quite a bit that is in the COVID relief bill.

Quote

But the CNN anchor pointed out even if bipartisanship is “very important” to Manchin, no Republicans ended up supporting the legislation in the end.

“Who do you blame for the fact that this bill got no Republican support in Congress?” Tapper pressed.

“I never do place blame. What I do place is basically we don’t have the tolerance to sit down and work more,” the senator responded, adding: “This was more of a bipartisan bill than you might think.”


I mention that because of this.

Quote

Tapper eventually swung the conversation to the failed attempt to include a $15 minimum wage in the bill, noting that Manchin and moderate Arizona Sen. Kyrsten Sinema have been singled out by progressives for holding back and calling for a smaller wage increase.

While Manchin said that there isn’t one member of the Senate that doesn’t want to increase the federal minimum wage, he continued to indicate that $15 is too much of a jump despite polls showing broad support for just that.

“You figure the numbers, it comes out to $11,” the West Virginia lawmaker said. “That is how I got to 11. We can do that very quickly, too, within a couple of years. Once we get to $11, it should be indexed for inflation so it never becomes a political football again.”


I still think $11 is a bit low but would take it (or preferable $12 or $13) especially with inflation indexing.

Not that I expect any Republican votes for anything. They don't govern anymore, no matter what their personal beliefs are.
" 'Individual conscience' means that women only get contraceptives if their employers, their physicians, their pharmacists, their husbands and/or fathers, pastors, and possibly their mayors, Governors, State Secretaries of Health, Congressmen, Senators, and President all agree that in that particular case they're justifiable." --D.C. Sessions

"That's the problem with being implacable foes - no one has any incentive to treat you as anything more than an obstacle to be overcome."

"The 'Road to Serfdom' is really all right turns." --Progressive Whisperer

""The GOP ... where every accusation is also a confession." --Progressive Whisperer

#1125 golden_valley

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Posted 08 March 2021 - 02:39 PM

View PostLFC, on 08 March 2021 - 02:15 PM, said:

Manchin continues to be interesting to me. Here he is basically saying that there are a lot of Republican Senators (and maybe Representatives) who actually agree with quite a bit that is in the COVID relief bill.




I mention that because of this.




I still think $11 is a bit low but would take it (or preferable $12 or $13) especially with inflation indexing.

Not that I expect any Republican votes for anything. They don't govern anymore, no matter what their personal beliefs are.

We need to ignore the political media and its questions about bipartisanship. Biden did try to sell it as something he could do, but realistically it can't be done as long as the people in the House and Senate are worried about getting primaries by the further right wing back home. And right now "small business" whatever that means wants nothing to do with a $15 minimum wage. That's what Manchin is alluding to.

#1126 AnBr

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Posted 09 March 2021 - 09:34 AM

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Professor of Philosophy Olúfẹ́mi Táíwò: Since our global society is built on racial capitalism, distributes these in a deeply stratified way, where different tiers of society experience markedly different levels of risk of exposure to environmental, financial, and interpersonal harm and violence. Responding to such a system must involve more than challenging this or that political leader or installing a few solar panels. It calls for us to find a way of protecting ourselves beyond the cannibalistic, violent model provided by the history of racial capitalism that built so much of today’s world – to find a way to protect ourselves by protecting each other. Basic income is one way forward."

https://evonomics.co...limate-justice/
“Trump’s a stupid man’s idea of a smart person, a poor man’s idea of a rich person & a weak man’s idea of a strong man.”

— Fran Lebowitz


“One of the saddest lessons of history is this: If we've been bamboozled long enough, we tend to reject any evidence of the bamboozle. We’re no longer interested in finding out the truth. The bamboozle has captured us. It's simply too painful to acknowledge, even to ourselves, that we’ve been taken. Once you give a charlatan power over you, you almost never get it back.”

— Carl Sagan


Pray for Trump: Psalm 109:8

"Science is more than a body of knowledge; it is a way of thinking. I have a foreboding of an America in my children's or grandchildren's time - when the United States is a service and information economy; when nearly all the key manufacturing industries have slipped away to other countries; when awesome technological powers arc in the hands of a very few, and no one representing the public interest can even grasp the issues; when the people have lost the ability to set their own agendas or knowledgeably question those in authority; when, clutching our crystals and nervously consulting our horoscopes, our critical faculties in decline, unable to distinguish between what feels good and what's true, we slide, almost without noticing, back into superstition and darkness.

— Carl Sagan
The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark
1995


“As democracy is perfected, the office of president represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron.”

— H.L. Mencken
On Politics: A Carnival of Buncombe


“The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little.”

— Franklin Delano Roosevelt
Second inaugural address January, 1937

#1127 LFC

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Posted 09 March 2021 - 09:44 AM

Biden again takes a pro-labor stance.

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A week after President Biden offered his support for a unionization effort by Amazon warehouse staffers in Alabama, the White House issued a statement endorsing the Protecting the Right to Organize Act. The pair of moves distinguishes Biden among his recent predecessors of both parties in his outspoken support of the labor movement.

The PRO Act is one of the most significant bills for the labor movement in decades: It would remove obstacles to workers forming unions without employer interference, and would effectively end the anti-union “right to work” laws that are currently in effect in 28 states. The legislation, which passed in the House last month, now awaits its fate in the Senate.

The progressive legislation could run into hurdles in the 50-50 split Senate, though Biden’s public support for it grants the potentially game-changing bill an important ally.

The White House’s statement of support, which was issued by the Office of Management and Budget, acknowledged that the PRO Act would protect workers’ rights to organize a union and use collective bargaining to fight for better wages, benefits and workplace conditions.

" 'Individual conscience' means that women only get contraceptives if their employers, their physicians, their pharmacists, their husbands and/or fathers, pastors, and possibly their mayors, Governors, State Secretaries of Health, Congressmen, Senators, and President all agree that in that particular case they're justifiable." --D.C. Sessions

"That's the problem with being implacable foes - no one has any incentive to treat you as anything more than an obstacle to be overcome."

"The 'Road to Serfdom' is really all right turns." --Progressive Whisperer

""The GOP ... where every accusation is also a confession." --Progressive Whisperer

#1128 AnBr

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Posted 09 March 2021 - 09:52 AM

California Program Giving $500 No-Strings-Attached Stipends Pays Off, Study Finds

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A high-profile universal basic income experiment in Stockton, Calif., which gave randomly selected residents $500 per month for two years with no strings attached, measurably improved participants' job prospects, financial stability and overall well-being, according to a newly released study of the program's first year.

The Stockton Economic Empowerment Demonstration, or SEED, was founded in February 2019 by then-Mayor Michael Tubbs and funded by donors, including the Economic Security Project.

It gave 125 people living in neighborhoods at or below Stockton's median household income the unconditional monthly stipend. A study of the period from February 2019 to February 2020, conducted by a team of independent researchers, determined that full-time employment rose among those who received the guaranteed income and that their financial, physical and emotional health improved.

“Trump’s a stupid man’s idea of a smart person, a poor man’s idea of a rich person & a weak man’s idea of a strong man.”

— Fran Lebowitz


“One of the saddest lessons of history is this: If we've been bamboozled long enough, we tend to reject any evidence of the bamboozle. We’re no longer interested in finding out the truth. The bamboozle has captured us. It's simply too painful to acknowledge, even to ourselves, that we’ve been taken. Once you give a charlatan power over you, you almost never get it back.”

— Carl Sagan


Pray for Trump: Psalm 109:8

"Science is more than a body of knowledge; it is a way of thinking. I have a foreboding of an America in my children's or grandchildren's time - when the United States is a service and information economy; when nearly all the key manufacturing industries have slipped away to other countries; when awesome technological powers arc in the hands of a very few, and no one representing the public interest can even grasp the issues; when the people have lost the ability to set their own agendas or knowledgeably question those in authority; when, clutching our crystals and nervously consulting our horoscopes, our critical faculties in decline, unable to distinguish between what feels good and what's true, we slide, almost without noticing, back into superstition and darkness.

— Carl Sagan
The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark
1995


“As democracy is perfected, the office of president represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron.”

— H.L. Mencken
On Politics: A Carnival of Buncombe


“The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little.”

— Franklin Delano Roosevelt
Second inaugural address January, 1937

#1129 LFC

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Posted 14 March 2021 - 12:02 PM

Marco Rubio actually supports a union at Amazon despite being fervently anti-union. Why? Because Amazon is mean to conservatives. No, seriously. (Paywalled.)

Quote

Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) published a fascinating piece of rhetorical jiu-jitsu Friday morning, attempting to at once to exercise the faux-populist political messaging popular with some Republicans in recent years, while also dismissing most unionization efforts as left-wing bullying.

How does he accomplish both? He positions himself against the politically correct, “woke” left, which, by his judgement, includes… one of the world’s most powerful companies.

In a USA Today op-ed, Rubio comes out with hedged — to put it mildly — support for the hugely consequential union drive at the Amazon facility in Bessemer, Alabama.

The op-ed follows stronger and more clear-cut messages of support from Joe Biden, who sent arguably the loudest pro-union signal in recent presidential history two weeks ago, and Democrats throughout Congress who’ve voiced their solidarity with the effort. Several Democratic members of Congress traveled to Bessemer last week to support the union drive.

By contrast, Rubio’s op-ed is anti-union in general. But he makes an exception for Bessemer. “Republicans have rightly understood the dangers posed by the unchecked influence of labor unions,” he writes. “Adversarial relations between labor and management are wrong.”

And later: “When it is a good American company — for example, certain American automakers — adversarial relations risk hurting labor and management alike by causing American industry to lose ground to foreign competition. And too often, the right to form a union has been, in practice, a requirement that business owners allow left-wing social organizers to take over their workplaces.”

Rubio separately asserts that organized labor’s top legislative priority in the 117th Congress, the PRO Act, “would essentially mandate adversarial relations between labor and management.”

So what makes Rubio support this particular union drive? While he uses some language about workers “having an increased say in working conditions,” his overwhelming focus is not on workers’ material circumstances, but rather Amazon corporate’s role as a player in the culture war.

Amazon, he opens the op-ed, “uses anticompetitive strategies to crush small businesses, bans conservative books and blocks traditional charities from participating in its AmazonSmile program. Not surprisingly, it has also bowed to China’s censorship demands.”

These are not the typical top priorities of a union. But they are top priorities for Republican politicians, like Rubio and Sen. Josh Hawley (R-MO), who are making a play at the type of Trumpian “populism” that gives voice to anti-corporate discontent without, in general, backing that up with policy that addresses workers’ rights and concerns.

In other words, Rubio is not so much writing in support of Amazon workers as he is using the Bessemer workers’ tooth-and-nail struggle as a rhetorical cudgel against Amazon’s management. “The days of conservatives being taken for granted by the business community are over,” he writes.

Companies like Amazon, he says, have been “allies of the left in the culture war.” And Amazon leadership is made up of “enthusiastic culture warriors” and “has decided to wage culture war against working-class values.”

The senator even constructs a slippery slope from Amazon’s notoriously bad working conditions to… “woke” H.R. departments.

“It is no fault of Amazon’s workers if they feel the only option available to protect themselves against bad faith is to form a union,” Rubio wrote. “Today it might be workplace conditions, but tomorrow it might be a requirement that the workers embrace management’s latest ‘woke’ human resources fad.”

The two issues aren’t related, unless you’re trying to use the real concerns represented by the former as a lever to introduce the latter, which seems to be Rubio’s aim.

By the end of the op-ed, he lumps the two issues together, again hijacking workers’ real material concerns to make the case for his own political priorities: “[Amazon’s] workers are right to suspect that its management doesn’t have their best interests in mind. Wealthy woke CEOs instead view them as a cog in a machine that consistently prioritizes global profit margins and stoking cheap culture wars. The company’s workers deserve better.”

This sort of argument has become part of Rubio’s brand in recent years, as he’s sought to recast himself to more comfortably inhabit Trump’s Republican Party. He wrote a similarly positioned piece in The Atlantic in 2018. At the time, the Miami New Times traced the intellectual history of the essay — the Heritage Foundation, former Mitt Romney advisor Oren Cass — and observed, “Rubio’s seemingly ‘populist’ turn during the last year is an ideologically empty attempt to put a working-class veneer over what are essentially the same politics he’s always espoused.”

Does Rubio’s op-ed help the Amazon unionization effort? It’s hard to say. It probably won’t hurt. Workers have been voting on the union question for weeks, and ballots will be accepted by the National Labor Relations Board through March 29.

We’ll see if anyone cites the senator’s writing as their motivation for voting “yes.” But my bet is the pro-union sentiment will be more in line with the words of support from Ervin Boyd — of Big E’s Gangsta Grille in Birmingham — who sent a message of solidarity in a video posted on a pro-union TikTok account recently.

“They need equal rights,” Boyd said. “They need better wages, better insurance. They’re working their asses off down there, getting our packages out. They need to get paid!”

" 'Individual conscience' means that women only get contraceptives if their employers, their physicians, their pharmacists, their husbands and/or fathers, pastors, and possibly their mayors, Governors, State Secretaries of Health, Congressmen, Senators, and President all agree that in that particular case they're justifiable." --D.C. Sessions

"That's the problem with being implacable foes - no one has any incentive to treat you as anything more than an obstacle to be overcome."

"The 'Road to Serfdom' is really all right turns." --Progressive Whisperer

""The GOP ... where every accusation is also a confession." --Progressive Whisperer

#1130 golden_valley

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Posted 14 March 2021 - 02:30 PM

View PostLFC, on 14 March 2021 - 12:02 PM, said:

Marco Rubio actually supports a union at Amazon despite being fervently anti-union. Why? Because Amazon is mean to conservatives. No, seriously. (Paywalled.)

So unions are bad but are okay if the workers work for a "bad" company? And the companies are only bad if they are "woke"? So hypothetically Hobby Lobby employees should not be allowed to form a union because it's a "good" company that is antiabortion while buying most of its inventory from China?

#1131 baw1064

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Posted 14 March 2021 - 02:57 PM

View Postgolden_valley, on 14 March 2021 - 02:30 PM, said:

So unions are bad but are okay if the workers work for a "bad" company? And the companies are only bad if they are "woke"? So hypothetically Hobby Lobby employees should be allowed to form a union because it's a "good" company that is antiabortion while buying most of its inventory from China?

Unions are also OK when they defend racist cops.
"strained legal arguments without merit and speculative accusations, unpled in the operative complaint and unsupported by evidence"

#1132 AnBr

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Posted 16 March 2021 - 12:07 AM

Posted Image
“Trump’s a stupid man’s idea of a smart person, a poor man’s idea of a rich person & a weak man’s idea of a strong man.”

— Fran Lebowitz


“One of the saddest lessons of history is this: If we've been bamboozled long enough, we tend to reject any evidence of the bamboozle. We’re no longer interested in finding out the truth. The bamboozle has captured us. It's simply too painful to acknowledge, even to ourselves, that we’ve been taken. Once you give a charlatan power over you, you almost never get it back.”

— Carl Sagan


Pray for Trump: Psalm 109:8

"Science is more than a body of knowledge; it is a way of thinking. I have a foreboding of an America in my children's or grandchildren's time - when the United States is a service and information economy; when nearly all the key manufacturing industries have slipped away to other countries; when awesome technological powers arc in the hands of a very few, and no one representing the public interest can even grasp the issues; when the people have lost the ability to set their own agendas or knowledgeably question those in authority; when, clutching our crystals and nervously consulting our horoscopes, our critical faculties in decline, unable to distinguish between what feels good and what's true, we slide, almost without noticing, back into superstition and darkness.

— Carl Sagan
The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark
1995


“As democracy is perfected, the office of president represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron.”

— H.L. Mencken
On Politics: A Carnival of Buncombe


“The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little.”

— Franklin Delano Roosevelt
Second inaugural address January, 1937

#1133 AnBr

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Posted 30 March 2021 - 09:57 AM

From a series of Tweets:

Quote

MadLori
@madlori

When discussing Universal Basic Income, inevitably the retort comes: "So you just want people to not have to work, is that it?" Accompanied by a smug smirk, expecting me to backpedal and hem and haw, say "Of course not, that's silly." Except ... yes. Yes, I do. 1/11

People shouldn't HAVE to work. People should WANT to work. Sharing in the labor of building and maintaining a society because it benefits everyone should be desirable, not forced. It shouldn't be something we do because we'll die otherwise. 2/11

Imagine a society where survival didn't depend on a job. Imagine how that would alter the fabric of ... everything. Imagine if you could leave a job without fearing the loss of income or healthcare. Imagine the power of the worker in that society. 3/11

If a person could survive without a job, imagine what employers would be like. They'd have to treat their workers fairly, and make themselves attractive to entice workers. They'd have to offer a better option than other employers, and make people want to participate. 4/11

Places that have offered UBI have seen the results: most people do want to work. The people who choose not to are generally young parents, students, people with disabilities and the elderly. people have a desire to contribute, for our lives to have purpose and to be useful. 5/11

And before you say it, yes, some people will take advantage. That is true for absolutely everything ever. You think people don't take advantage of the economy we have? Like, say, the 1% who grow wealthier while their employees have to work three jobs and use food stamps? 6/11

They can only do that, by the way, because people are so terrified of losing a job and the destruction that would follow that they tolerate mistreatment, disempowerment, the destruction of their unions, healthcare, retirements and even their bodies to avoid it. 7/11

That would not be the case if everyone were guaranteed a baseline survival income. Your boss couldn't treat you like shit because he knows you can't leave. You CAN leave, and you will. 8/11

What if desperation didn't motivate everything? Imagine the impact on health, relationships, parenting, wellbeing, crime, violence, progress. When you aren't desperately scrabbling for the rent, you can spare a neuron to contemplate long-term problems. 9/11

Imagine a society where terror of destitution wasn't a constant thrum underneath everyone's existence. Imagine the creative works that society could produce. Imagine the children it could raise, the elderly it could care for. Imagine the inventions it could produce. 10/11

Now, imagine knowing all this and thinking "NOPE. We can't have all that, because someone I don't like might benefit from it. So to avoid that, the rest of you can all hang." And there you have modern conservative thinking. 11/11

1:13 PM - 7/23 19 - Twitter Web Client

“Trump’s a stupid man’s idea of a smart person, a poor man’s idea of a rich person & a weak man’s idea of a strong man.”

— Fran Lebowitz


“One of the saddest lessons of history is this: If we've been bamboozled long enough, we tend to reject any evidence of the bamboozle. We’re no longer interested in finding out the truth. The bamboozle has captured us. It's simply too painful to acknowledge, even to ourselves, that we’ve been taken. Once you give a charlatan power over you, you almost never get it back.”

— Carl Sagan


Pray for Trump: Psalm 109:8

"Science is more than a body of knowledge; it is a way of thinking. I have a foreboding of an America in my children's or grandchildren's time - when the United States is a service and information economy; when nearly all the key manufacturing industries have slipped away to other countries; when awesome technological powers arc in the hands of a very few, and no one representing the public interest can even grasp the issues; when the people have lost the ability to set their own agendas or knowledgeably question those in authority; when, clutching our crystals and nervously consulting our horoscopes, our critical faculties in decline, unable to distinguish between what feels good and what's true, we slide, almost without noticing, back into superstition and darkness.

— Carl Sagan
The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark
1995


“As democracy is perfected, the office of president represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron.”

— H.L. Mencken
On Politics: A Carnival of Buncombe


“The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little.”

— Franklin Delano Roosevelt
Second inaugural address January, 1937

#1134 Rich T Bikkies

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Posted 30 March 2021 - 12:31 PM

10 000 Likes
Reality is a hallucination caused by alcohol deprivation. Unknown.

Only Satan can rebuke sin. The righteous don't know enough. Rudyard Kipling

God is not dead. He was merely voted out of office. Unknown.

You can do anything with anybody if you just save them the trouble of thinking. Rudyard Kipling

People don’t believe in ideas: they believe in people who believe in ideas. Ze’ev Mankowitz

#1135 AnBr

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Posted 02 April 2021 - 08:20 PM

Posted Image
“Trump’s a stupid man’s idea of a smart person, a poor man’s idea of a rich person & a weak man’s idea of a strong man.”

— Fran Lebowitz


“One of the saddest lessons of history is this: If we've been bamboozled long enough, we tend to reject any evidence of the bamboozle. We’re no longer interested in finding out the truth. The bamboozle has captured us. It's simply too painful to acknowledge, even to ourselves, that we’ve been taken. Once you give a charlatan power over you, you almost never get it back.”

— Carl Sagan


Pray for Trump: Psalm 109:8

"Science is more than a body of knowledge; it is a way of thinking. I have a foreboding of an America in my children's or grandchildren's time - when the United States is a service and information economy; when nearly all the key manufacturing industries have slipped away to other countries; when awesome technological powers arc in the hands of a very few, and no one representing the public interest can even grasp the issues; when the people have lost the ability to set their own agendas or knowledgeably question those in authority; when, clutching our crystals and nervously consulting our horoscopes, our critical faculties in decline, unable to distinguish between what feels good and what's true, we slide, almost without noticing, back into superstition and darkness.

— Carl Sagan
The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark
1995


“As democracy is perfected, the office of president represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron.”

— H.L. Mencken
On Politics: A Carnival of Buncombe


“The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little.”

— Franklin Delano Roosevelt
Second inaugural address January, 1937

#1136 golden_valley

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Posted 02 April 2021 - 08:26 PM

 AnBr, on 02 April 2021 - 08:20 PM, said:

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But that put money into the pockets of the "makers" not into the pockets of the people who butcher your meat, pick your strawberries, wipe your elderly parents' rears. You know, those "takers" that actually directly touch the lives of most people in the US.





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