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Nigeria: Boko Haram Muslims Kidnap 100s of Christian Girls for Slavery and Child Brides


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#1 dsp

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Posted 07 May 2014 - 03:16 PM

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"I abducted your girls," Shekau said, in an hour-long video that opens with fighters shooting guns into the air and shouting "Allahu akbar!" "By Allah, I will sell them in the marketplace.”

catching the continent's most-wanted man will require venturing into the 23,000-square-mile Sambisa, whose dangers have taken on mythical proportions.

The forest's thorny vegetation is 6 feet high in some places, impenetrable without the use of heavy cutlasses to chop trails. According to locals, the wilderness was a primary grazing grounds for stray elephants from central Africa as a game reserve before 2006. It’s now believed that Boko Haram could be hiding in bunkers here previously used by the military to protect the indigenous residents of the region.

Fox News: Bokam Haram Terrorists, kidnap victims believed hiding in vast treacherous forest

CSM: Unlike Boko Haram's many massacres girls' kidnapping brings it home

#2 dsp

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Posted 07 May 2014 - 03:17 PM

Meant to post under non-politics if it matters.

#3 Central TX Mom

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Posted 07 May 2014 - 04:37 PM

The whole thing is infuriating. And I have no idea what anyone should do to fix this situation.

#4 baw1064

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Posted 07 May 2014 - 07:44 PM

That's the big question: what exactly do you do to solve this?

dsp, the kidnapped girls were probably muslim, not Christian, as northern Nigeria is mostly muslim (but not enough to satisfy Boko Haram).

What I think is most likely to happen is similar to the Shining Path when Fujimori came to power. Boko Haram has most definitely jumped the shark, and the international community is likely to let out a big yawn when either the present government or a future one pulls out all the stops and dispenses with the Geneva Convention, human rights, etc.

Sorry I can't be more optimistic.
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#5 dsp

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Posted 07 May 2014 - 09:31 PM

I saw a report identifying the girls as Christians. I'll try to find it.

I think you solve it the only way possible. Organize a mission. Rescue as many girls as possible. Take them to safety. Then, deal with the Boko Haram using the only language they understand.

#6 LFC

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Posted 07 May 2014 - 09:41 PM

View Postdsp, on 07 May 2014 - 09:31 PM, said:

I think you solve it the only way possible. Organize a mission. Rescue as many girls as possible. Take them to safety. Then, deal with the Boko Haram using the only language they understand.

Yes, because other missions seeking out guerillas in countryside that we don't know where we stick out like sore thumbs and aren't particularly welcome have worked so well.
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#7 Central TX Mom

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Posted 07 May 2014 - 09:58 PM

View Postdsp, on 07 May 2014 - 09:31 PM, said:

I think you solve it the only way possible. Organize a mission. Rescue as many girls as possible. Take them to safety. Then, deal with the Boko Haram using the only language they understand.

So much easier said than done. I can imagine Bruce Willis as the star of this movie. But real life doesn't happen as smoothly as a movie. In real life an operation like this would likely go to shit in no time flat.

#8 J-CA

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Posted 07 May 2014 - 10:49 PM

You mean using UAVs and without due process?
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#9 baw1064

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Posted 07 May 2014 - 11:04 PM

View PostJ-CA, on 07 May 2014 - 10:49 PM, said:

You mean using UAVs and without due process?

I'm sure they will enjoy as much due process as combatants in other civil wars in West Africa have. I don't think the U.S. should get directly involved largely because it's liable to be an extremely violent train wreck.

UAVs aren't all that useful in a heavily forested region anyway--unless we were to spray the whole place with defoliants. That worked so well the last time we tried it...
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Posted 08 May 2014 - 02:57 AM

View Postbaw1064, on 07 May 2014 - 11:04 PM, said:

UAVs aren't all that useful in a heavily forested region anyway--unless we were to spray the whole place with defoliants. That worked so well the last time we tried it...

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#11 cmk

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Posted 08 May 2014 - 07:31 AM

View PostCentral TX Mom, on 07 May 2014 - 09:58 PM, said:

So much easier said than done. I can imagine Bruce Willis as the star of this movie. But real life doesn't happen as smoothly as a movie. In real life an operation like this would likely go to shit in no time flat.

On the plus side, it would be fodder for a whole new thread castigating the Obama administration.
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#12 Traveler

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Posted 08 May 2014 - 07:42 AM

View Postbaw1064, on 07 May 2014 - 11:04 PM, said:


I'm sure they will enjoy as much due process as combatants in other civil wars in West Africa have. I don't think the U.S. should get directly involved largely because it's liable to be an extremely violent train wreck.

UAVs aren't all that useful in a heavily forested region anyway--unless we were to spray the whole place with defoliants. That worked so well the last time we tried it...

Technology has improved since those days. I believe enough infrared signatures would still filter through to enable a UAV to keep tabs. Plus, once you have tracked them to their base, its pretty easy to keep eyes on them whenever they mobilize. I would think a constant monitoring presence would definitely assist ground troops. And I see no problem whatsoever of taking them out from a drone. Why should drone strikes be considered any different from dumb bombs or artillery in terms of due process? Silliest thing I have ever read. This is a fucking war. 1500 civilians have been killed by BH so far this year. Now as to who operates them and gives the strike orders? That is where it gets sticky.
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#13 dsp

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Posted 08 May 2014 - 07:54 AM

View PostJ-CA, on 07 May 2014 - 10:49 PM, said:

You mean using UAVs and without due process?

I meant the Nigerian authorities or military ought to do it. Nigeria is one of the most advanced African nations. It has a larger economy than South Africa. I believe Nigerian immigrants to America have one of the highest or maybe the highest number of Ph.Ds per capita. There are competent people in Nigeria. Let them deal with it. This group is itching for a military response, and they should get one.

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Posted 08 May 2014 - 08:30 AM

Good background on BH by the NYT. Even AQ thinks they are too violent. The gubmint sure didnt help with how they tried to stamp it out back in 2009.
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#15 dsp

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Posted 08 May 2014 - 09:10 AM

Another wrinkle. This is The Guardian.

Western Intervention will turn Nigeria Into an African Afghanistan: The plight of kidnapped girls is set against the corruption and inequality that the west's economic war has helped to create


Quote

There is widespread corruption, yet weapons and armies are paid to protect the wealthy and the foreign companies like Shell that want to access the country’s resources, especially oil.

There is rightly anger that so little has been done by the Nigerian government to find the girls, and that those who have demonstrated in huge numbers against President Goodluck Jonathan have themselves been accused of causing trouble or even temporarily arrested.

But we should be wary of the narrative now emerging. This follows a wearily familiar pattern, one we have already seen in south Asia and the Middle East, but that is increasingly being applied to Africa as well.

It is the refrain that something must be done and that "we" – the enlightened west – must be the people to do it. As the US senator Amy Klobuchar put it: "This is one of those times when our action or inaction will be felt not just by those schoolgirls being held captive and their families waiting in agony, but by victims and perpetrators of trafficking around the world. Now is the time to act."

The call has been for western intervention to help find the girls, and to help "stabilise" Nigeria in the aftermath of their kidnap.

The British government has offered "practical help".

Yet western intervention has time and again failed to deal with particular problems and – worse – has led to more deaths, displacements and atrocities than were originally faced. All too often it has been justified with reference to women's rights, claiming that enlightened military forces can create an atmosphere where women are free from violence and abuse. The evidence is that the opposite is the case.


#16 baw1064

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Posted 08 May 2014 - 09:11 AM

Following the CSM link in dsp's original post led met to this article.

Apparently all the reports in the western media about the meaning of the group's name are based on a bad translation.

http://www.csmonitor...cation-is-a-sin

The fact that we can't even get the name straight doesn't bode well.
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#17 J-CA

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Posted 08 May 2014 - 09:17 AM

View Postdsp, on 08 May 2014 - 07:54 AM, said:

I meant the Nigerian authorities or military ought to do it. Nigeria is one of the most advanced African nations. It has a larger economy than South Africa. I believe Nigerian immigrants to America have one of the highest or maybe the highest number of Ph.Ds per capita. There are competent people in Nigeria. Let them deal with it. This group is itching for a military response, and they should get one.
Of course, the jungles in Nigeria probably make Vietnam look like a cakewalk and heavy-handedness might be called-for but it seldom works out for the best, it is literally the origin for this more-insane reincarnation of this originally insane group.

Funny that you bring up how educated Nigerians can be, Boko Haram was started as a reactionary movement because of anger about how those well-educated elites in the big cities have been screwing over rural Nigerians ever since independence. Those "competent people" have been cultivating resentment for decades.
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#18 J-CA

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Posted 08 May 2014 - 09:23 AM

View Postbaw1064, on 08 May 2014 - 09:11 AM, said:

Following the CSM link in dsp's original post led met to this article.
Apparently all the reports in the western media about the meaning of the group's name are based on a bad translation.
http://www.csmonitor...cation-is-a-sin
The fact that we can't even get the name straight doesn't bode well.

If you read the article to the end it seems to actually support the thing that it says the media is getting wrong:

Quote

Newman explains that when Britain's colonial government began introducing its education system into Nigeria, seeking to replace traditional Islamic education (including replacing the Arabic script traditionally used to write Hausa with a Roman-based script that they also quickly called "boko") , this was seen as a "fraudulent deception being imposed upon the Hausa by a conquering European force."[indent]
Rather than send their own children to the British government schools, as demanded by the British, Hausa emirs and other elites often shifted the obligation onto their slaves and other subservients. The elite had no desire to send their children to school where the values and traditions of Hausa and Islamic traditional culture would be undermined and their children would be turned into ’yan boko,’ i.e., “(would-be) westerners”.[/indent]
Newman accepts (as can been in the passage above) that "boko" is reasonably associated with "Western education" in English translation today. But the actual resistance was to something being imposed by triumphant foreigners. I suspect that an imposition of a Japanese or Chinese or Indian educational system would have been just as boko (in the sense of "bogus") to the Hausa elites of a century ago as the British imposition. And it would probably not go down well today.

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#19 cmk

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Posted 08 May 2014 - 09:52 AM

I always assumed "Boko" was a bastardization of "beaucoup" since there are many French speakers in Africa.
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#20 dsp

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Posted 08 May 2014 - 10:04 AM

View PostJ-CA, on 08 May 2014 - 09:17 AM, said:

Of course, the jungles in Nigeria probably make Vietnam look like a cakewalk and heavy-handedness might be called-for but it seldom works out for the best, it is literally the origin for this more-insane reincarnation of this originally insane group.

Funny that you bring up how educated Nigerians can be, Boko Haram was started as a reactionary movement because of anger about how those well-educated elites in the big cities have been screwing over rural Nigerians ever since independence. Those "competent people" have been cultivating resentment for decades.

I have little doubt that is true, but I think any group that believes it has the right to engage in mass child kidnappings for slavery forfeits any right to have its grievances heard. That does not mean that rural Nigerians in general who are not aligned with this group ought to have their grievances ignored. One of their main complaints seems to be that the nation's oil revenues are benefiting a rather small, centralized group, rather than the nation as a whole.

The LA Times article below is about the relationship between violent insurgencies and corruption at the top. It turns out the most corrupt nations are also grappling with the most violent insurgencies. Regarding corruption in Nigeria specifically, one recent development was 20b going missing from the central bank.

Personally, while I haven't researched this topic, I have no trouble believing the British educated a tiny elite in Nigeria for other than purely humanitarian reasons. I could see the British giving up direct colonial control of Nigeria, and then moralizing about how it abandoned colonialism, while knowing the elite that it educated would continue to play ball with the British. It turns out that British Petroleum has been hunting for oil in Nigeria since the early 1900s and profiting from it since about the 50s.

Quote

Shell-BP and other developers in the pursuit for commercially available petroleum found oil in Nigeria in 1956. Prior to the discovery of oil, Nigeria like many other African countries strongly relied on agricultural exports to other countries to supply their economy. Many Nigerians thought the developers were looking for—palm oil.[2] But after nearly 50 years searching for oil in the country, Shell-BP discovered the oil at Oloibiri in the Niger Delta. Wishing to utilize this newfound oil opportunity, the first oil field began production in 1958.[3] After that, the economy of Nigeria would have seemingly experienced a strong increase. However, competition for the profits that oil produces has created a great level of terror and conflict for those living in the region. Citizens of Nigeria believe that they haven’t been able to see the economic benefits of oil companies in the state. Additionally, because Nigerian government officials have remained majority shareholders in the profits created by the production of Nigerian oil, this leads to government capturing of nearly all oil production, and citizens are not seeing socioeconomic benefits, and insist that oil companies should compensate people.[2]

http://articles.lati...rgency-20140327

http://en.wikipedia....a#Oil_discovery





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