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So long Internet... it was nice knowing you


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#501 Probabilistic

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Posted 14 June 2019 - 11:26 AM

View PostLFC, on 14 June 2019 - 07:05 AM, said:

The House Intelligence Committee held hearings on "deep fake" videos. Devin Nunes (Explain to me again how he could possibly be on a committee with the word "intelligence" in the name?) jumped up and pretty much proved that he himself is a deep fake. What a tool.

It's a representative government, after all.

#502 AnBr

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Posted 14 June 2019 - 05:26 PM

View PostProbabilistic, on 14 June 2019 - 11:26 AM, said:

It's a representative government, after all.

“As democracy is perfected, the office of president represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron.”

— H.L. Mencken
On Politics: A Carnival of Buncombe

Pray for Trump: Psalm 109:8

"Science is more than a body of knowledge; it is a way of thinking. I have a foreboding of an America in my children's or grandchildren's time - when the United States is a service and information economy; when nearly all the key manufacturing industries have slipped away to other countries; when awesome technological powers arc in the hands of a very few, and no one representing the public interest can even grasp the issues; when the people have lost the ability to set their own agendas or knowledgeably question those in authority; when, clutching our crystals and nervously consulting our horoscopes, our critical faculties in decline, unable to distinguish between what feels good and what's true, we slide, almost without noticing, back into superstition and darkness.

— Carl Sagan
The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark
1995


“As democracy is perfected, the office of president represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron.”

— H.L. Mencken
On Politics: A Carnival of Buncombe


“The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little.”

— Franklin Delano Roosevelt
Second inaugural address January, 1937

#503 LFC

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Posted 08 July 2019 - 12:25 PM

Trump, another threat to the internet. As much as I've posted about various companies and their abuses I can't imagine somebody less trustworthy with how to deal with the issues of the web than Trump, not even Zuckerberg.

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Social media giants Twitter and Facebook haven’t been invited to the White House’s social media summit.

White House spokesman Judd Deere had told the New York Times that the event will “bring together digital leaders for a robust conversation on the opportunities and challenges of today’s online environment.”

According to CNN Business, those “digital leaders” will not include any Twitter or Facebook employees.

However, Thursday’s summit will include far-right groups such as Turning Points USA and the Heritage Foundation.

Trump has repeatedly complained about being “censored” on Twitter, engaging with the conservative conspiracy theory that social media platforms are hiding their content.

“Social Media is totally discriminating against Republican/Conservative voices,” he tweeted in August 2018.

" 'Individual conscience' means that women only get contraceptives if their employers, their physicians, their pharmacists, their husbands and/or fathers, pastors, and possibly their mayors, Governors, State Secretaries of Health, Congressmen, Senators, and President all agree that in that particular case they're justifiable." --D.C. Sessions

"That's the problem with being implacable foes - no one has any incentive to treat you as anything more than an obstacle to be overcome."

"The 'Road to Serfdom' is really all right turns." --Progressive Whisperer

""The GOP ... where every accusation is also a confession." --Progressive Whisperer

#504 LFC

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Posted 18 July 2019 - 10:44 AM

Yet another in a long, long, LONG list of reasons why we need strong privacy protection laws that govern anybody doing anything on the internet. The laws should be set up such that the people who designed this should go to jail.

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When we use browsers to make medical appointments, share tax returns with accountants, or access corporate intranets, we usually trust that the pages we access will remain private. DataSpii, a newly documented privacy issue in which millions of people’s browsing histories have been collected and exposed, shows just how much about us is revealed when that assumption is turned on its head.

DataSpii begins with browser extensions—available mostly for Chrome but in more limited cases for Firefox as well—that, by Google's account, had as many as 4.1 million users. These extensions collected the URLs, webpage titles, and in some cases the embedded hyperlinks of every page that the browser user visited. Most of these collected Web histories were then published by a fee-based service called Nacho Analytics, which markets itself as “God mode for the Internet” and uses the tag line “See Anyone’s Analytics Account.”

Web histories may not sound especially sensitive, but a subset of the published links led to pages that are not protected by passwords—but only by a hard-to-guess sequence of characters (called tokens) included in the URL. Thus, the published links could allow viewers to access the content at these pages. (Security practitioners have long discouraged the publishing of sensitive information on pages that aren't password protected, but the practice remains widespread.)

According to the researcher who discovered and extensively documented the problem, this non-stop flow of sensitive data over the past seven months has resulted in the publication of links to:
  • Home and business surveillance videos hosted on Nest and other security services
  • Tax returns, billing invoices, business documents, and presentation slides posted to, or hosted on, Microsoft OneDrive, Intuit.com, and other online services
  • Vehicle identification numbers of recently bought automobiles, along with the names and addresses of the buyers
  • Patient names, the doctors they visited, and other details listed by DrChrono, a patient care cloud platform that contracts with medical services
  • Travel itineraries hosted on Priceline, Booking.com, and airline websites
  • Facebook Messenger attachments and Facebook photos, even when the photos were set to be private.
In other cases, the published URLs wouldn’t open a page unless the person following them supplied an account password or had access to the private network that hosted the content. But even in these cases, the combination of the full URL and the corresponding page name sometimes divulged sensitive internal information. DataSpii is known to have affected 50 companies, but that number was limited only by the time and money required to find more. Examples include:
  • URLs referencing teslamotors.com subdomains that aren’t reachable by the outside Internet. When combined with corresponding page titles, these URLs showed employees troubleshooting a “pump motorstall fault,” a “Raven front Drivetrain vibration,” and other problems. Sometimes, the URLs or page titles included vehicle identification numbers of specific cars that were experiencing issues—or they discussed Tesla products or features that had not yet been made public. (See image below)
  • Internal URLs for pharmaceutical companies Amgen, Merck, Pfizer, and Roche; health providers AthenaHealth and Epic Systems; and security companies FireEye, Symantec, Palo Alto Networks, and Trend Micro. Like the internal URLs for Tesla, these links routinely revealed internal development or product details. A page title captured from an Apple subdomain read: "Issue where [REDACTED] and [REDACTED] field are getting updated in response of story and collection update APIs by [REDACTED]"
  • URLs for JIRA, a project management service provided by Atlassian, that showed Blue Origin, Jeff Bezos’ aerospace manufacturer and sub-orbital spaceflight services company, discussing a competitor and the failure of speed sensors, calibration equipment, and manifolds. Other JIRA customers exposed included security company FireEye, BuzzFeed, NBCdigital, AlienVault, CardinalHealth, TMobile, Reddit, and UnderArmour.
Clearly, this is not good. But how did it happen?

" 'Individual conscience' means that women only get contraceptives if their employers, their physicians, their pharmacists, their husbands and/or fathers, pastors, and possibly their mayors, Governors, State Secretaries of Health, Congressmen, Senators, and President all agree that in that particular case they're justifiable." --D.C. Sessions

"That's the problem with being implacable foes - no one has any incentive to treat you as anything more than an obstacle to be overcome."

"The 'Road to Serfdom' is really all right turns." --Progressive Whisperer

""The GOP ... where every accusation is also a confession." --Progressive Whisperer

#505 Traveler

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Posted 18 July 2019 - 12:26 PM

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In the end, he said, the extensions that he found to have collected browsing histories that later appeared on Nacho Analytics include:
  • Fairshare Unlock, a Chrome extension for accessing premium content for free. (A Firefox version of the extension, available here, collects the same browsing data.)
  • SpeakIt!, a text-to-speech extension for Chrome.
  • Hover Zoom, a Chrome extension for enlarging images.
  • PanelMeasurement, a Chrome extension for finding market research surveys
  • Super Zoom, another image extension for both Chrome and Firefox. Google and Mozilla removed Super Zoom from their add-ons stores in February or March, after Jadali reported its data collection behavior. Even after that removal, the extension continued to collect browsing behavior on the researcher’s lab computer weeks later.
  • SaveFrom.net Helper a Firefox extension that promises to make Internet downloading easier. Jadali observed the data collection only in an extension version downloaded from the developer. He did not observe the behavior in the version that was previously available from Mozilla’s add-ons store.
  • Branded Surveys, which offers chances to receive cash and other prizes in return for completing online surveys.
  • Panel Community Surveys, another app that offers rewards for answering online surveys.
Thankfully, I dont have any of these. If any of you do, I suggest uninstalling pronto.
"Men occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of them pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing had happened."-- Winston Churchill
"Anyone who has the power to make you believe absurdities has the power to make you commit injustices" Voltaire





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