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Activist attorney Allred: Limbaugh violated 'chastity' law in criticizing Fluke


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#1 cmk

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Posted 09 March 2012 - 07:20 AM

I doubt this will go anywhere, but it's good fun:

Quote

Allred released a letter she sent Thursday to the Palm Beach County Attorney's Office in West Palm Beach, Fla., demanding that Limbaugh be prosecuted under an obscure Florida statute, Section 836.04, which states, according to the letter:

"Defamation -- Whoever speaks of and concerning any woman, married or unmarried, falsely and maliciously imputing to her a want of chastity, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor of the first degree, punishable as provided in s.775.082 or s.775.083."

But County Attorney Denise Nieman pointed out to CNBC in an email that her office does not investigate or prosecute alleged criminal behavior and that Allred should have directed her letter to the State Attorney's Office. Allred, whose practice is based in Los Angeles, emailed CNBC later to say a new version of the letter has been forwarded.

Letter is here.

The claim here is, on the surface at least, similar to something I mentioned during a recent debate over whether or not Fluke has a case for defamation against Limbaugh.
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#2 Raskolnik

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Posted 09 March 2012 - 07:32 AM

One of the major targets for reform of the legal system is venue-shopping. Why should a court in Florida hear a case concerning remarks that were made in New York about a student in Virginia--brought forward by an attorney from California?

#3 cmk

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Posted 09 March 2012 - 07:39 AM

View PostRaskolnik, on 09 March 2012 - 07:32 AM, said:

One of the major targets for reform of the legal system is venue-shopping. Why should a court in Florida hear a case concerning remarks that were made in New York about a student in Virginia--brought forward by an attorney from California?

I presume the answer to this would be "because it was broadcast nationally". I'm sure there are all sorts of jurisdiction issues, and I'm not sure why she chose Florida. Actually, isn't that Limbaugh's primary residence now? I seem to recall his show now often starting out with something like "From sunny South Florida..."

ETA: Per Wikipedia: "Limbaugh's radio home in New York City was the talk-format station WABC, 770 AM, and this remains his flagship station (although Limbaugh now hosts his program from West Palm Beach, Florida)."
Charles M. Kozierok - Administrator, TalkRadioSucks.com

"The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly, is to fill the world with fools." -- Herbert Spencer

"Atheism is a religion like abstinence is a sex position." -- Bill Maher


"Our new Government['s] foundations are laid, its cornerstone rests, upon the great truth that the negro is not equal to the white man; that slavery, subordination to the superior race, is his natural and moral condition." -- Alexander Stephens, Vice-President of the Confederacy

#4 Raskolnik

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Posted 09 March 2012 - 08:04 AM

Ahhhh yes, that does change things somewhat. (I never listen to Rush so I had no idea).

I think it is unfortunate that the fat slob has made a reasoned discussion about the role of religious conscience in medical decisions impossible. I'm not sure prosecuting him is the best way to continue that discourse.

#5 Baron Siegfried

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Posted 09 March 2012 - 08:55 AM

That's actually the biggest problem that Rush, Sean, Bill O, and that merry little band creates - they drag any kind of discourse down into the gutter and commence to rasslin'. And though it's taken a while for things to really get this bad; the precursor to all this was Point - Counterpoint, and the MacLaughlin Group. Any venue where the norms of broadcast etiquette were replaced with panelists shouting at / over the top of one another was the start down the slippery slope. The worst part is that I don't think there's a way back to civility (takes too much effort), and there's plenty of slippery slope into the chasm of cacophony still before us.

Though the idea of 'Pundit Deathmatch' does have a certain appeal . . .
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#6 cmk

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Posted 09 March 2012 - 09:04 AM

Actually, I think I view this in the opposite way. I see people like Limbaugh not as the cause of the inability to have reasoned discussion about the role of religious conscience in medical decisions. I see him as a symptom. He reflects the feelings of most people and politicians on the right -- they don't want to have reasoned discussions about anything, they simply want to have their way and have it now, and if it takes demonizing people like Sandra Fluke, so be it.
Charles M. Kozierok - Administrator, TalkRadioSucks.com

"The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly, is to fill the world with fools." -- Herbert Spencer

"Atheism is a religion like abstinence is a sex position." -- Bill Maher


"Our new Government['s] foundations are laid, its cornerstone rests, upon the great truth that the negro is not equal to the white man; that slavery, subordination to the superior race, is his natural and moral condition." -- Alexander Stephens, Vice-President of the Confederacy

#7 Morrisminor

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Posted 09 March 2012 - 09:08 AM

While I have voluminously heaped scorn on Fatbo over the years and for his latest fracas, I find Alread to be a legal parasite & prima donna of the first magnitude. This is nothing but a 1st amendment infringement. Let Fluke use libel laws to grab a chunk of Rush's loot but leave this legal voodoo out of it

#8 davisss13

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Posted 09 March 2012 - 11:31 AM

You can't ban him. You can boycott his advertisers.

Personally, I want him on the air, doubling down on the bs and alienating even more people from the GOP.

#9 Practical Girl

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Posted 09 March 2012 - 12:04 PM

Personally, I want him on the air, doubling down on the bs and alienating even more people from the GOP

Would I cry if Rush's empire imploded and he slunk away to irrelevance? Nope. But it freaks me out a bit to think of him operating sans any controls, just as it freaks me out to think of Glenn Beck still out there, still throwing crazy that many take as Gospel, but now without even the most modest of levels of repsonsibility. "Barack Obama, The Most Biblically Hostile President of All Time" was a recent topic. I can't bring myself to listen to it, and it's nice to know that he probably has fewer people hanging on his words. But the ones who remain are the true believers who will continue to spread his conspiracies and lies.

Limbaugh is vile every day of the week, and gets away with attacks similar to the one he threw at Sandra Fluke on a regular basis. He does this with very little fear, since he's very practiced at his "art". I shudder to think about what he'd really be spreading to Dittoheads, if he had zero fear of consequences.
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#10 Raskolnik

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Posted 09 March 2012 - 12:23 PM

View Postcmk, on 09 March 2012 - 09:04 AM, said:

Actually, I think I view this in the opposite way. I see people like Limbaugh not as the cause of the inability to have reasoned discussion about the role of religious conscience in medical decisions. I see him as a symptom. He reflects the feelings of most people and politicians on the right -- they don't want to have reasoned discussions about anything, they simply want to have their way and have it now, and if it takes demonizing people like Sandra Fluke, so be it.

This is a good point and further serves to illustrate the gap between "movement conservatives" and conservatively- or religiously-minded citizens whose interests the conservative movement purports to represent.





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