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Hurrah for Australia - so far. Morrison and others speak out about China


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#1 George Rowell

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Posted 15 May 2020 - 11:53 PM

We almost seem to be going it alone against China, almost. Trump is tackling China too but his message is too blurred, not focused enough. Here is what a former government adviser has to say -

.“Australia’s interests will be best served by a multipolar region than one that’s dominated absolutely by China,” said Richard Maude, a former senior adviser on foreign policy and national security issues in the Office of the Prime Minister who is now an executive director of policy at the Asia Society. “China likes to condition countries to defer automatically to its interests for fear of retaliation, and that’s not a position that Australia can allow itself to be put into.”

I find the silence of Europe's leaders particularly disappointing. IMO, letting Chinese migrant workers work for us in squalid unhealthy conditions and die for us while our companies got rich was short-sighted. No body really cared. I appreciate that because there are no global regulations and with everybody ignoring China's lack of compliance with the WTO conditions, there has been no level playing field. Companies had to exploit the situation or go under. Simple as that. Anyway, now our greed and lack of concern has created a monster that wants everything and we are still squabbling amongst ourselves. Pathetic.

Notice the “China likes to condition countries to defer automatically to its interests for fear of retaliation". That is absolutely the Chinese way. There are a couple of old Chinese sayings - 'Kill a chicken scare the monkeys' and 'Beat the dog before the lion'. Chinese modern day philosophy is deeply embedded in the past. To get to understand the Chinese better you only have to look at their proverbs, they are as alive now as they ever were.
A doctor knows a little about a lot. A specialist knows a lot about a little. In time the doctor knows less and less about more and more and the specialist knows more and more about less and less until ultimately the doctor knows nothing about everything and the specialist knows everything about nothing.

#2 Rich T Bikkies

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Posted 16 May 2020 - 04:12 AM

 George Rowell, on 15 May 2020 - 11:53 PM, said:

Notice the “China likes to condition countries to defer automatically to its interests for fear of retaliation". That is absolutely the Chinese way. There are a couple of old Chinese saying - 'Kill a chicken scare the monkeys' and 'Beat the dog before the lion'. Chinese philosophy is deeply embedded in the past. To get to understand them better you only have to look at their proverbs, they are as alive now as they ever were.

The ethics of the Mob. With, these days, the PRA in the background as Murder Incorporated. You're like me, George: sometimes we just have to channel the Fat Boy in The Pickwick Papers: "I want to make your flesh creep". Question: how, historically, did the Chinese fit this into Confucianism?
Reality is a hallucination caused by alcohol deprivation.

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You can do anything with anybody if you just save them the trouble of thinking.
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#3 George Rowell

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Posted 16 May 2020 - 07:00 AM

 Rich T Bikkies, on 16 May 2020 - 04:12 AM, said:

The ethics of the Mob. With, these days, the PRA in the background as Murder Incorporated. You're like me, George: sometimes we just have to channel the Fat Boy in The Pickwick Papers: "I want to make your flesh creep". Question: how, historically, did the Chinese fit this into Confucianism?
I am not correcting you Bikkie and if you consider the ethics of pharmaceutical companies then I will go with the Mob any day. Company directors have a duty to do what is best for the company, of course, but I believe that most people want to do the right thing. Without a level playing field, doing the right thing will cause most companies to go broke quickly. That is sad.
Although I have been in China 20 yrs and Taiwan 3, my knowledge of the Chinese comes from first hand experience, speaking the language, doing business there and marrying a wonderful Shanghai (hao guniang), not formal study. I have witnessed how they cheat and lie and how callous they can be to mortals lesser than themselves. That really, really, really sucks. Successful liars and grafters are generally, but not always, admired because they must be smart. I blame a lot of this on the cultural revolution but not all of it. I realized something else too, if you do not understand a system then do not rush to judge it, a rule I break often.
So you may wonder where this is going. I am not a Chinese scholar and do not have the qualifications to comment on Confucius. I can tell you about the Chinese family - it is great, and life outside the family - it sucks, connections (guanxu) and so on but nothing much academic.
A doctor knows a little about a lot. A specialist knows a lot about a little. In time the doctor knows less and less about more and more and the specialist knows more and more about less and less until ultimately the doctor knows nothing about everything and the specialist knows everything about nothing.

#4 Rich T Bikkies

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Posted 16 May 2020 - 08:26 AM

 George Rowell, on 16 May 2020 - 07:00 AM, said:

. . . I realised something else too, if you do not understand a system then do not rush to judge it, a rule I break often.

So you may wonder where this is going. I am not a Chinese scholar and do not have the qualifications to comment on Confucius. I can tell you about the Chinese family - it is great, and life outside the family - it sucks, connections(guanxu) and so on but nothing academic.

Noted. Something I learned, about twenty years too late: never judge a country by its politicians and its political culture; never judge its ordinary citizens by its politicians and its political culture.
Reality is a hallucination caused by alcohol deprivation.

Only Satan can rebuke sin. The righteous don't know enough.
Rudyard Kipling

God is not dead. He was merely voted out of office.

You can do anything with anybody if you just save them the trouble of thinking.
Rudyard Kipling

People don’t believe in ideas: they believe in people who believe in ideas. Ze’ev Mankowitz

#5 George Rowell

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Posted 18 May 2020 - 08:41 PM

It is not about Confucius, Kongzi, but here are a couple of snippets that may interest you. One of the obvious symbolisms of power in China is the lion. It projects power and cowers your enemies, a constant theme in Chinese history. Like the size and format of the 'Forbidden City' (zi jin chen), actually taken to mean you cannot get in without the emperor's permission, it is meant to stun you and put you in your place, it is simply awe inspiring, staggering. I would recommend any body who can to visit it. The huge central entrance is only for the king and the smaller ones for lesser mortals. There is also one for scholars, itself a very important part of the ruling plan because the gates emphasis the roles people must take in life. FYI there were 4 classes of people, anyway move on. IMO the forbidden city puts you in your place more than St Pauls or the Vatican. Both are wondrous and both tell you there is something bigger in life than your existence. I really want to comment on the lion statues, but before the forbidden city topic I would like to mention the emperors palaces. Down the ages there have been bigger and better palaces but each new dynasty erases every trace trace of the former including their great palaces, sometimes down to the last brick. What we have now is just the last few palaces of a multitude. The lion however is a constant theme because it symbolizes kingship and power. They cannot erase but they change it. If you have a modicum of knowledge you can look at monumental lions and proudly pronounce the dynasty. Some actually look little like lions anymore. The ball under the paw means a lot of things but it comes down to power projection, it says I control the World with one paw. The ball also symbolizes the emperors union of earthly and heavenly powers and gives the emperor legitimacy. Way back the Emperor was depicted as a dragon, again with that ball in his claw. It is all about power projection and roles and classes, that has not changed much in China.

As an after thought you were also restricted on the type of wall you could build or roof, or front door, depending on your position and class. In the forbidden city the little triangles at the corners of the roof indicated the rank required to enter. A bit similar to the walk ways in the Colosseum. Aristocrats went in one direction and commoners had to navigate perpendicularly and wait at the intersections. Putting people in their place.
A doctor knows a little about a lot. A specialist knows a lot about a little. In time the doctor knows less and less about more and more and the specialist knows more and more about less and less until ultimately the doctor knows nothing about everything and the specialist knows everything about nothing.





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