Jump to content


The Homeless - The Latest Right-Wing Attack Point


22 replies to this topic

#1 LFC

    Fiscal Conservative

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 30541 posts
  • LocationPennsylvania

Posted 14 September 2019 - 10:01 AM

Screeching about the homeless, a situation that Republicans of course have done nothing about and if anything have made worse, seems to be the latest attack line. Faux News is amplifying the shit out of it of course. It's all about attacking liberals. There are zero realistic solutions being proposed which is pretty much par for the course for anything Republican. Since this sounds like it will be a continuing line of attack, perhaps one of the few they have, I expect this thread to continue.

Quote

Before Trump administration officials landed this week in Los Angeles on a visit ostensibly aimed at understanding the city’s homelessness crisis, Fox News had been pounding a steady drum beat of fear-mongering about the issue.

President Trump’s new focus on intervening in blue cities — which are home to some of his most vocal political critics — appears driven less by sincere concern about the plight of the poor and more by a desire to find a new vehicle for lobbing criticisms at liberal politicians, as well as immigrants.

Currently, according to reports in the Washington Post and New York Times, Trump officials are looking at ideas — such as cracking down on homelessness camps — that would trample all over federalism and the bill of rights, and not even begin to go at the root causes of extreme poverty.

The campaign bears similarities to Trump’s attacks on immigrants and his smears of cities like Baltimore as being a “disgusting, rat and rodent infested mess.”

Here are 5 points on how the homeless have become Trump’s latest scapegoat.

" 'Individual conscience' means that women only get contraceptives if their employers, their physicians, their pharmacists, their husbands and/or fathers, pastors, and possibly their mayors, Governors, State Secretaries of Health, Congressmen, Senators, and President all agree that in that particular case they're justifiable." --D.C. Sessions

"That's the problem with being implacable foes - no one has any incentive to treat you as anything more than an obstacle to be overcome."

"The 'Road to Serfdom' is really all right turns." --Progressive Whisperer

""The GOP ... where every accusation is also a confession." --Progressive Whisperer

#2 LFC

    Fiscal Conservative

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 30541 posts
  • LocationPennsylvania

Posted 14 September 2019 - 10:09 AM

There's a link to Media Matters that quotes some of the Faux News coverage.

Quote

The network has painted a grim picture of American cities as “almost Third World in their decay,” facing “a complete breakdown of the basic needs of civilization,” and filled with “drugged-out zombies chasing barefooted babies.” Fox has largely focused on the issue in cities on the West Coast -- mostly focusing on cities in liberal California, with a few segments on Denver; Seattle; and Portland and Eugene, OR. Every city Fox highlighted has at least one thing in common: Democratic leaders. And the problem Fox identified in each city is more or less the same -- the Democratic leaders and their “rich friends” prefer to push “social justice initiatives,” “socialist solutions,” and “liberal compassion” instead of properly addressing mental illness or engaging in punitive crackdowns on homelessness (Fox's preference). One Fox host even suggested the solution in Los Angeles is to “bulldoze the 50-block radius” and “institutionalize everybody.”

Despite the attention Fox has been paying to the issue, the network has been silent about the Trump administration’s lack of serious interest in tackling America’s homelessness crisis. President Donald Trump’s White House “has twice proposed eliminating the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness, which coordinates efforts among more than a dozen federal agencies.” He has also proposed additional work requirements for federal housing aid and food stamps, and Trump’s tax reform bill “weakened the low-income tax credit, which is the primary tool we have to promote affordable housing.”

Instead, Fox hosts, anchors, and guests have repeatedly used degrading and dehumanizing terms to describe the homelessness problem and thus to attack Democratic politicians such as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio. Some Fox figures have tried to suggest that the real victims of homelessness are not homeless people themselves, but the “normal people” who are confronted with the problem in public parks and libraries. Others have tried to contrast the issue with unrelated Democratic proposals to provide resources for undocumented immigrants, implying that it’s not fair to allocate resources to other marginalized people while homelessness still persists. One Fox guest discussing homelessness in Los Angeles claimed that Democrats “want to take that nationwide in 2020 with this presidential election,” and another said that LA’s homelessness is “a template of what the Democrats want to continue.”

It is clear that Fox plans to make this topic a part of its strategy ahead of 2020 by using the real and serious problem of homelessness to demonize Democrats and fearmonger about socialism. Below is a rundown of some of the network’s recent attacks:

" 'Individual conscience' means that women only get contraceptives if their employers, their physicians, their pharmacists, their husbands and/or fathers, pastors, and possibly their mayors, Governors, State Secretaries of Health, Congressmen, Senators, and President all agree that in that particular case they're justifiable." --D.C. Sessions

"That's the problem with being implacable foes - no one has any incentive to treat you as anything more than an obstacle to be overcome."

"The 'Road to Serfdom' is really all right turns." --Progressive Whisperer

""The GOP ... where every accusation is also a confession." --Progressive Whisperer

#3 golden_valley

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6030 posts
  • LocationNorthern California

Posted 16 September 2019 - 12:00 AM

Is this Trump's election season hobby horse? It was the "caravans are coming" in 2018 and it turned out not many voters in swing districts were swayed by that. So now it's the homeless in blue states and cities.

#4 Rue Bella

    Emerging from a state of cryogenic denial

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 8062 posts
  • LocationSoCal

Posted 16 September 2019 - 12:16 AM

What about putting the homeless in all those FEMA camps Obama was planning on sticking conservatives in. Or whatever that rumor was.
What is wrong with these people? ~ PG

California Secession - Let my people go!

#5 LFC

    Fiscal Conservative

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 30541 posts
  • LocationPennsylvania

Posted 16 September 2019 - 10:50 AM

TAC has a piece that jumps on the homelessness bandwagon, conveniently selecting Modesto, California as the place being destroyed by government policy. Gotta' love this little summary.

Quote

Modesto’s 200,000-strong population is stable by numbers, but taxpaying residents are dying and departing, while the lumpen and tragic arrive. Many residents are profoundly angered by state and federal authorities’ willingness to warehouse these newcomers at their civic expense, but welfare bureaucracies are local extensions of Sacramento and Washington, D.C. From rough truckers to homeschooling moms, the white working class turns to Donald J. Trump for relief. Democratic officials court Latino voters and pro-immigrant interests.

Got that? The homeless problem in Modesto is the fault of those mean old Democrats' "welfare bureaucracies." The good white people of Modesto would be doing just great if not for them. Here's another beaut using the term "the custodial state."

Quote

How did the nation’s stewards let this happen? What moral gate broke open, allowing obvious social pathologies to fester without stigma? Get used to it will not do as a response. And it’s not just Modesto or California. Alexander Payne and Bruce Springsteen mourn what’s happened in their native Nebraska and New Jersey, respectively. To wave away such melancholy and call it nostalgia is both wrong and deeply insulting. As social critic Robert Nisbet once observed, the custodial state leads to mass boredom, and efforts to offset that boredom—through media, sports, pornography, or drugs—stimulate emotionalism while undermining character and community.

" 'Individual conscience' means that women only get contraceptives if their employers, their physicians, their pharmacists, their husbands and/or fathers, pastors, and possibly their mayors, Governors, State Secretaries of Health, Congressmen, Senators, and President all agree that in that particular case they're justifiable." --D.C. Sessions

"That's the problem with being implacable foes - no one has any incentive to treat you as anything more than an obstacle to be overcome."

"The 'Road to Serfdom' is really all right turns." --Progressive Whisperer

""The GOP ... where every accusation is also a confession." --Progressive Whisperer

#6 golden_valley

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6030 posts
  • LocationNorthern California

Posted 16 September 2019 - 02:48 PM

View PostLFC, on 16 September 2019 - 10:50 AM, said:

TAC has a piece that jumps on the homelessness bandwagon, conveniently selecting Modesto, California as the place being destroyed by government policy. Gotta' love this little summary.



Got that? The homeless problem in Modesto is the fault of those mean old Democrats' "welfare bureaucracies." The good white people of Modesto would be doing just great if not for them. Here's another beaut using the term "the custodial state."

The constant looking for the right person or institution to blame problems on is a distraction and an excuse to avoid the need to take real action to alleviate the problems. It lets everyone off the hook because they aren't at "fault."

#7 LFC

    Fiscal Conservative

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 30541 posts
  • LocationPennsylvania

Posted 20 September 2019 - 03:03 PM

Krugman takes on the bashing of California by Trump and the rest of the right. The fact is that by most metrics it's better than most (all?) of the red states. It must be tough to have such a big, shining example of socialism that's kicking your ass on so many fronts.

Quote

According to economist and New York Times opinion columnist Paul Krugman, there are two Californias: “the real state on America’s left coast, and the fantasy state of the right’s imagination.” In a piece published this Friday, Krugman says that President Trump is using the latter to take away the state’s ability to set its own regulations on vehicle emissions standards and to label its homeless crisis as an “environmental threat.”

Krugman says that it’s important to remember that California does indeed have real problems, like its “sky-high housing costs,” which are likely contributing to its homeless problem, but it does well in almost every other aspect.

Quote

It has a booming economy, which has been creating jobs at a much faster pace than the nation as a whole.

It has the nation’s second-highest life expectancy, comparable to that in European nations with much higher life expectancy than America as a whole. This is, by the way, a relatively new development: Back in 1990, life expectancy in California was only average.

At the same time, California, having enthusiastically implemented Obamacare and tried to make it work, has seen a sharp drop in the number of residents without health insurance. And crime, although it has ticked up slightly in the past few years, remains near a historic low.

Krugman writes that despite these attributes, conservatives are resentful that the once conservative state has gone overwhelmingly liberal, partly due to its rising Hispanic and Asian populations. As liberals enacted their agenda in the state, the results went against conservative predictions of its eventual “economic suicide.”

Quote

What is happening instead, of course, is that the usual suspects are trying to portray California as a terrible place — beset by violent crime and rampant disease — in sheer denial of reality. And they have seized on the issue of homelessness, which is, to be fair, a genuine problem. Furthermore, it’s a problem brought on by bad policy — not high taxes or excessively generous social programs, but the runaway NIMBYism that has prevented California from building remotely enough new housing to accommodate its rising population.

Despite Trump’s past rhetoric promoting state’s rights, he wants to strip away California’s power in what Krugman calls “an attempt both to punish an anti-Trump state and to blacken its reputation.”

" 'Individual conscience' means that women only get contraceptives if their employers, their physicians, their pharmacists, their husbands and/or fathers, pastors, and possibly their mayors, Governors, State Secretaries of Health, Congressmen, Senators, and President all agree that in that particular case they're justifiable." --D.C. Sessions

"That's the problem with being implacable foes - no one has any incentive to treat you as anything more than an obstacle to be overcome."

"The 'Road to Serfdom' is really all right turns." --Progressive Whisperer

""The GOP ... where every accusation is also a confession." --Progressive Whisperer

#8 Rue Bella

    Emerging from a state of cryogenic denial

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 8062 posts
  • LocationSoCal

Posted 21 September 2019 - 12:48 AM

Quote

...like its “sky-high housing costs,” which are likely contributing to its homeless problem,

The greatest cause of homelessness IMO is our weather - that is also a major reason the high housings costs exist - it's just nice to live here. If you are homeless, you can sleep outside all winter and not freeze to death. There are also shelters that open when temps do get too low to be comfortable. In my area there are homeless enclaves, but they are not camps on the public streets, but in canyons, near beaches, along streams, in shrubs covered areas, etc.

Trump hates California almost as much as he hates Obama.
What is wrong with these people? ~ PG

California Secession - Let my people go!

#9 JackD

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1862 posts
  • LocationChicago area

Posted 21 September 2019 - 10:47 AM

Well, there are substantial problems with homelessness in areas that don't have good weather (e.g. Chicago, Seattle, New York). California weather, like Hawaii's, certainly influences it there but I think the major factor is poverty and housing costs.

#10 Rue Bella

    Emerging from a state of cryogenic denial

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 8062 posts
  • LocationSoCal

Posted 21 September 2019 - 05:01 PM

Quote

California weather, like Hawaii's, certainly influences it there but I think the major factor is poverty and housing costs.

Along with poverty and housing costs I'd add mental illness, alcoholism/substance abuse, family issues/no safety net, and perhaps a general ineptness or resistance to surviving in today's mainstream society. There are so many reasons. But with many tax payers averse to 'throwing money' at the situation, what can be done about it? Probably not much more than what is being done already.

I did look it up briefly. Apparently most homeless people tend to stay in their home areas. If it were me, I'd migrate to the warmth - but then I'm neither cold nor homeless.
What is wrong with these people? ~ PG

California Secession - Let my people go!

#11 baw1064

    formerly of the public sector

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 5069 posts
  • LocationEarthquakes, tsunamis, and volcanos--oh my!

Posted 22 September 2019 - 12:29 AM

View PostJackD, on 21 September 2019 - 10:47 AM, said:

Well, there are substantial problems with homelessness in areas that don't have good weather (e.g. Chicago, Seattle, New York). California weather, like Hawaii's, certainly influences it there but I think the major factor is poverty and housing costs.

So I live in Seattle. Upon seeing a homeless person asleep between getting off the bus and reaching my house the other day, I started thinking about why homelessness is a thing.

For one thing, I'll point out that Seattle doesn't have winter weather approaching Chicago and New York. Palm trees actually grow here (surprised the heck out of me when I first moved here). We did have a freakishly snowy and cold February last year, but that is definitely the exception.

I largely agree with Rue, that it's a combination of high housing prices, minimum wages that aren't commensurate with the cost of housing, substance abuse (and inadequate funding for treatment programs) and mental health issues (and lack of adequate funding to deal with same).

High housing prices are to some extent the fault of the locals, but the rest I put squarely on the R's who spend all their time dissing the "left coast".
“Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, Nothing is going to get better. It's not.” --Dr. Seuss

#12 golden_valley

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6030 posts
  • LocationNorthern California

Posted 22 September 2019 - 01:31 PM

The fault of locals meaning the "not in my backyard" restrictive zoning and imposition of fees that only developers that build high priced apartment complexes can afford? If that's what you mean, then yes I agree.

In a heated real estate market, as it has been in my part of CA, the landlords are a problem too. Seeing the rents increase due to scarcity landlords of lower end apartments are constructively evicting current tenants by raising rents when the lease is about to end, then upgrading the buildings to charge higher rent. The evicted people can't find replacement apartments at a price they can afford, so they couch surf with family and friends or live in their cars.

#13 Rue Bella

    Emerging from a state of cryogenic denial

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 8062 posts
  • LocationSoCal

Posted 22 September 2019 - 03:23 PM

In my area, the median home price is close to 1M with homes still selling well. Rentals are not inexpensive either. There are low income properties, though not enough for those who want them. Many of our basic services are provided by people who either are packed into homes with relatives, or live out of town with at least a 1 hour commute both ways because they can't afford to live here. These are not homeless individuals.

Even though there is still a water crunch here, every square inch of land is being developed because there is money to be made in a sellers' market. And there are more than enough people to buy the properties because they simply want to live here.

If however you want to live in an area that you can't afford - what are the alternatives? Homelessness aside, do people have the right to live exactly where they want without enough $$ to pay the rent?
What is wrong with these people? ~ PG

California Secession - Let my people go!

#14 baw1064

    formerly of the public sector

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 5069 posts
  • LocationEarthquakes, tsunamis, and volcanos--oh my!

Posted 22 September 2019 - 03:30 PM

View Postgolden_valley, on 22 September 2019 - 01:31 PM, said:

The fault of locals meaning the "not in my backyard" restrictive zoning and imposition of fees that only developers that build high priced apartment complexes can afford? If that's what you mean, then yes I agree.

In a heated real estate market, as it has been in my part of CA, the landlords are a problem too. Seeing the rents increase due to scarcity landlords of lower end apartments are constructively evicting current tenants by raising rents when the lease is about to end, then upgrading the buildings to charge higher rent. The evicted people can't find replacement apartments at a price they can afford, so they couch surf with family and friends or live in their cars.

Yes, that's exactly what I mean. The people who have managed to afford to buy a place want their property values to keep rising, which means restricting new development. Also nobody wants their neighborhood built with single family homes 100 years ago to be upzoned. And, unlike your area, there isn't much flat land here--lots of water and topography, further restricting housing options.
“Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, Nothing is going to get better. It's not.” --Dr. Seuss

#15 baw1064

    formerly of the public sector

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 5069 posts
  • LocationEarthquakes, tsunamis, and volcanos--oh my!

Posted 22 September 2019 - 03:40 PM

View PostRue Bella, on 22 September 2019 - 03:23 PM, said:

If however you want to live in an area that you can't afford - what are the alternatives? Homelessness aside, do people have the right to live exactly where they want without enough $$ to pay the rent?

Well, but looking at it another way, it's not possible to have a population center consisting solely of people writing iPhone apps, running cloud applications for Amazon, or the 1%. Somebody's got to feed them, as one example. People might want to live in HCOL areas because of climate and cultural amenities, but the local job market has something to do with it, too. If most of the jobs are available in places where it's not possible to live on the salary those jobs pay, then we have an insoluble problem.
“Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, Nothing is going to get better. It's not.” --Dr. Seuss

#16 Rue Bella

    Emerging from a state of cryogenic denial

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 8062 posts
  • LocationSoCal

Posted 22 September 2019 - 03:54 PM

Quote

If most of the jobs are available in places where it's not possible to live on the salary those jobs pay, then we have an insoluble problem.

In my area many service people often are forced to commute - even fire and police often live out of town. Unless your family bought here decades ago, as mine did. Extended families pool their incomes and live crowded, or rent out parts of their homes. When there are not enough service people, then things will change. But many people will - and do - make great sacrifices to remain here.

Frankly there are simply too many people who want to live in California and there is just not enough room (or water) for everyone. People make fun of the state and our hippy tree-huggers, etc, but many would love to live here.
What is wrong with these people? ~ PG

California Secession - Let my people go!

#17 AnBr

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 13610 posts

Posted 22 September 2019 - 09:49 PM

View Postbaw1064, on 22 September 2019 - 03:40 PM, said:

Well, but looking at it another way, it's not possible to have a population center consisting solely of people writing iPhone apps, running cloud applications for Amazon, or the 1%. Somebody's got to feed them, as one example. People might want to live in HCOL areas because of climate and cultural amenities, but the local job market has something to do with it, too. If most of the jobs are available in places where it's not possible to live on the salary those jobs pay, then we have an insoluble problem.

A century or so ago city neighborhoods tended to be more economically mixed so that the needs of services could be met by those willing to fill them. Many cities also had nearby housing development areas for workers of various factories. It allowed workers to be within walking distances of the available work. It also created a sense of community that was not quite so bound by economic status.
“Trump’s a stupid man’s idea of a smart person, a poor man’s idea of a rich person & a weak man’s idea of a strong man.”

— Fran Lebowitz


“One of the saddest lessons of history is this: If we've been bamboozled long enough, we tend to reject any evidence of the bamboozle. We’re no longer interested in finding out the truth. The bamboozle has captured us. It's simply too painful to acknowledge, even to ourselves, that we’ve been taken. Once you give a charlatan power over you, you almost never get it back.”

— Carl Sagan


Pray for Trump: Psalm 109:8

"Science is more than a body of knowledge; it is a way of thinking. I have a foreboding of an America in my children's or grandchildren's time - when the United States is a service and information economy; when nearly all the key manufacturing industries have slipped away to other countries; when awesome technological powers arc in the hands of a very few, and no one representing the public interest can even grasp the issues; when the people have lost the ability to set their own agendas or knowledgeably question those in authority; when, clutching our crystals and nervously consulting our horoscopes, our critical faculties in decline, unable to distinguish between what feels good and what's true, we slide, almost without noticing, back into superstition and darkness.

— Carl Sagan
The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark
1995


“As democracy is perfected, the office of president represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron.”

— H.L. Mencken
On Politics: A Carnival of Buncombe


“The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little.”

— Franklin Delano Roosevelt
Second inaugural address January, 1937

#18 Traveler

    Rambling Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 13334 posts
  • LocationPhilly Area

Posted 23 September 2019 - 07:54 AM

View PostRue Bella, on 21 September 2019 - 12:48 AM, said:

The greatest cause of homelessness IMO is our weather - that is also a major reason the high housings costs exist - it's just nice to live here. If you are homeless, you can sleep outside all winter and not freeze to death. There are also shelters that open when temps do get too low to be comfortable. In my area there are homeless enclaves, but they are not camps on the public streets, but in canyons, near beaches, along streams, in shrubs covered areas, etc.

Trump hates California almost as much as he hates Obama.
Believe it or not, homeless folks are major contributors to CA's pathogen problems in runoff (but by no means the only ones). Doesn't take a lot of shit to foul the streams and close the beaches for everyone. They are spending billions on this issue, when moderate income housing would solve a that part of it. With all the other benefits...
"Men occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of them pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing had happened."-- Winston Churchill
"Anyone who has the power to make you believe absurdities has the power to make you commit injustices" Voltaire

#19 golden_valley

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6030 posts
  • LocationNorthern California

Posted 23 September 2019 - 10:23 AM

View PostTraveler, on 23 September 2019 - 07:54 AM, said:

Believe it or not, homeless folks are major contributors to CA's pathogen problems in runoff (but by no means the only ones). Doesn't take a lot of shit to foul the streams and close the beaches for everyone. They are spending billions on this issue, when moderate income housing would solve a that part of it. With all the other benefits...

Yup it's happening in the American River here in Sacramento. Lots of people camp along there.

#20 Bact PhD

    Frustrated, Thoughtful Independent

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1895 posts
  • LocationFlorida

Posted 24 September 2019 - 05:05 PM

Here, we have two subsets of homeless. The first set is the year-round local crowd; the second is the transient group that passes through twice a year en route south in the fall and north in the spring. Some combination of both seems to set up shop at the interstate interchange underpasses; the panhandling segment is present at nearly every intersection within a half-mile east or west. Most years the transients would be through in about 4-6 weeks. However, in recent years that stay has extended; one season the encampment didn't move on for the entire summer and into the fall -- local conventional wisdom says it took concerted action by law enforcement to get the group out. Worse, to allude to Traveler's comment, there was a second camp about 150 yards east, on the edges of a drainage ditch separating two businesses -- YUCK!!

South FL, in particular, has similar issues with housing costs vs. wages for service folk. Frankly, I don't see the situation improving, even with the metro development expanding northward. The topographical issue limiting further building is the Everglades -- hell's bells, they already drained, canal-ed, and generally mucked around with too much of that already...

Yet somehow, Flori-DUH manages to escape the Wrath. I wonder why--??? :o
Politics these days is show business. Elections are Dancing with the Stars with consequences. ~Rue Bella

(About fame) Living for likes, shares and follows is a form of validation. The question is whether it is also the source of our self esteem. If it is, we’re screwed. And, culturally, it seems as if it’s become more and more our shared value. ... Meringue is no longer a sweet and pretty topping but the body itself. ~Charles Perez

"If a nation expects to be ignorant and free in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be." --Thomas Jefferson to Charles Yancey, 1816. ME 14:384, via LFC, 12/1/2016

Competent people go in one of a few directions. But incompetence is infinite. ~David Brooks, NY Times





1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users